Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 6th Oct 2008 10:37 UTC, submitted by John Mills
Mono Project The Mono project has released Mono 2.0. As most of you will know, Mono is an open-source implementation of Microsoft's .NET framework for Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, and other operating systems. The 2.0 release comes packed with new features, the main ones being the compiler upgrade to C# 3.0 with support for LINQ, as well as the inclusion of ADO.NET 2.0, ASP.NET 2.0 and System.Windows.Forms 2.0. The release notes detail all the changes and new features.
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RE[7]: Amazing
by google_ninja on Wed 8th Oct 2008 05:58 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Amazing"
google_ninja
Member since:
2006-02-05

IIS and apache started around the same time (94-95), and they both sucked pretty bad for a really long time. Apache did stop sucking first though, v2 was a great product. IIS sucked really bad right up till v6. v7 is the first that I would call a great product (just launched with vista/2k8)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Amazing
by sbergman27 on Wed 8th Oct 2008 08:38 in reply to "RE[7]: Amazing"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

IIS and apache started around the same time (94-95), and they both sucked pretty bad for a really long time. Apache did stop sucking first though, v2 was a great product.

I disagree. Apache 1.3 (and before, really) was a great product. So much so that even with the improvements in 2.0, they had problems getting admins to upgrade. They had reached a level of maturity, by that time, that has a lot in common with what Vista faces with XP today.

I'll take your word that current IIS doesn't suck. MS's IIS statistics are better than they used to be. ("used to be" being dismal, indeed.) But then, aren't they paying good money to web hosts to get those good, but still not anywhere near Apache-level statistics?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[9]: Amazing
by google_ninja on Wed 8th Oct 2008 19:31 in reply to "RE[8]: Amazing"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

I disagree. Apache 1.3 (and before, really) was a great product. So much so that even with the improvements in 2.0, they had problems getting admins to upgrade. They had reached a level of maturity, by that time, that has a lot in common with what Vista faces with XP today.


1.3 far from sucked, but it wasn't great. It was only when stuff got modular that I would say apache definitively pulled ahead of everyone else.

I'll take your word that current IIS doesn't suck. MS's IIS statistics are better than they used to be. ("used to be" being dismal, indeed.) But then, aren't they paying good money to web hosts to get those good, but still not anywhere near Apache-level statistics?


The fate of IIS is tied to ASP, for a very long time the only reason anyone used it at all is if they had to deploy asp sites. There is an adage amoung microsoft folks that it takes 3 major rewrites for a killer product to come out of redmond. Back in the days of classic ASP, MS had a terrible enterprise story from pretty much top to bottom (there were good ideas in COM+, in real life it was a nightmare), and there was a mass migration over to the Java/Oracle stack. IIS6 (win2k3) was the first version that performed well and was secure, the big problem that was still with it was administration and modularity (and the fact that ASP.net was still executed pretty far down the pipeline as an ISAPI filter)

IIS 7 changed that. It got way more modular, and alot of work went into playing better then others (MS is now pushing it as a good platform for PHP). The caching work brought it right up to apaches level when it comes to performance, and it became possible to on the fly plug modules into it written in managed code on a per application basis, which IMO puts it well past apache as an appserver. They did a massive overhaul on the GUI, added in simple to use remote admin interfaces, and made the whole thing scriptable via powershell. They also cleaned up the remaining rough spots, like being the worst ftp server on the planet, and FINALLY giving us a mod_rewrite equivilent.

From a dev point of view, I would say IIS definately has the edge now as of 7 as an appserver. I am nowhere near as strong on the IT side, and I don't know anyone that is strong in both the unix and MS worlds in IT, but from talking to people and what I have read, IT guys tend to still favor apache due to the simplicity of httpd.conf (IIS uses XML now, but it is this cascading system of files that is spread all over the OS)

Probably way more then you ever wanted to know, but I love talking about this sort of stuff ;) As it stands, IIS is still pretty much synchronous with ASP deployments, but expect to see that change as the years roll on.

Reply Parent Score: 2