Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Oct 2008 11:36 UTC, submitted by M-Saunders
Features, Office After three years of development, OOo 3.0 is finally here with a bunch of new features and enhancements. Linux Format looks at the changes and rates the suite's overall performance, and you can try it yourself by downloading a copy from here.
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RE[3]: 100% compatible
by sbergman27 on Mon 13th Oct 2008 16:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: 100% compatible"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

"Send me an (editable) file that looks right when opened with Office 2003" is the only real requirement...

You said that using OO.o would be "gambling with your grades":

I'm not in the mood for gambling with my grades

That's spreading "Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt" in my book. And when confronted you quickly changed the subject.

If it is that critical that the document look *exactly* as you want it, you should be using a format like PDF. MS Office documents don't print out or view exactly the same even between different versions of MS Office. Why gamble on your grades by using it?

Edited 2008-10-13 16:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[4]: 100% compatible
by emerson999 on Mon 13th Oct 2008 16:50 in reply to "RE[3]: 100% compatible"
emerson999 Member since:
2007-12-08

I think you might have forgotten what it's like to be in school. If the instructor wants a doc file, you do not send a pdf. If something like spacing, margins, or anything else is off they're probably not going to cut you slack for using openoffice or accept that different word processors are going to produce different results. Especially when you're the only one in class who seems to have trouble with it. Now, I 'was' able to do all my papers in openoffice. But I can see why someone might be nervous about it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: 100% compatible
by wannabe geek on Mon 13th Oct 2008 17:53 in reply to "RE[4]: 100% compatible"
wannabe geek Member since:
2006-09-27

I know exactly what you feel. In some situations, having 90% compatibility is almost just as bad as having 0% compatibility. IMHO, one has to live with the fact that sometimes you just can't use the tools you prefer. If you try to make do with bad compatibility you end up hating the not-quite-compatible FOSS application, when it may be a great tool on its own if you remove the strict format compatibility requirement. It's a good thing to raise awareness about alternatives, but you have to keep your marks and then your job.

I most appreciate OO's compatibility with MS Office when importing documents, but AFAIK, completely seamless interaction between the two office suites is just not possible at the moment.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: 100% compatible
by darknexus on Mon 13th Oct 2008 20:26 in reply to "RE[4]: 100% compatible"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Yep I got bit by that one, funny thing is I was using Office 2003 at the time and they were using Office XP (no I didn't *want* to use 2003 but that was what they had on some of the systems at the time). Different versions of office don't always treat their own files the same, so that's an issue bigger than simply Openoffice's word compatibility. And don't even get me started on opening Office 2000-created files in 2007, that can be worse than OO in some cases, much worse. Same for office on the PC vs on the Mac, it can be a nightmare.
The thing is, even with a so-called standard document format, people have different ideas of what some of the features mean and how they behave. So I'm not sure we'll ever have 100% compatibility across office suites even with the same file formats. And then there's those that ignore the standard or deliberately use it differently to "add features."

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: 100% compatible
by sbergman27 on Mon 13th Oct 2008 21:27 in reply to "RE[4]: 100% compatible"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I think you might have forgotten what it's like to be in school. If the instructor wants a doc file, you do not send a pdf.

Perhaps things have changed. When I was in school we used a lot of dtf files and content was more important than file format.

Reply Parent Score: 3