Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Oct 2008 11:36 UTC, submitted by M-Saunders
Features, Office After three years of development, OOo 3.0 is finally here with a bunch of new features and enhancements. Linux Format looks at the changes and rates the suite's overall performance, and you can try it yourself by downloading a copy from here.
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RE[7]: 100% compatible
by lemur2 on Mon 13th Oct 2008 23:00 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: 100% compatible"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

When applying for a job, 95% of all companies/agencies want your resume emailed to them in MS Word Format. Sending them a PDF file is as good as never getting called for an interview. Ridiculous yes, however it is reality, at least here in the US. So in reality these day, sadly, format is more important than content to business.


Why on earth would it be a problem to send your resume to a prospective employer as a MS Word Format document created by OpenOffice?

However annoying it might be, this is NOT a reason to use Microsoft Office over OpenOffice.

In fact, if you use Office 2007, and your prospective employer uses an older version of Office, then you are very likely to have a better result if you prepare your resume with OpenOffice than if you had prepared it using Office 2007 and saved it in "compatibility mode".

OpenOffce offers better compatibility that Office 2007 does.

This is actually an argument to use OpenOffice, not Microsoft Office 2007.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: 100% compatible
by DrillSgt on Mon 13th Oct 2008 23:13 in reply to "RE[7]: 100% compatible"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"Why on earth would it be a problem to send your resume to a prospective employer as a MS Word Format document created by OpenOffice?

However annoying it might be, this is NOT a reason to use Microsoft Office over OpenOffice."


The only reason would be that formatting is handled differently. I never said to use one over the other, I use both. Depends on what is being asked for and what the requirements are. The fact is, depending on the formatting choices you make in OO.o, the document, although saved in .doc format, will look totally different when opened in MS Office.

"In fact, if you use Office 2007, and your prospective employer uses an older version of Office, then you are very likely to have a better result if you prepare your resume with OpenOffice than if you had prepared it using Office 2007 and saved it in "compatibility mode"."

I have not found this to be true. I imagine if you carefully formatted a document in OO.o, then yes, that would work.

I am not the enemy here, just pointing out my observations. I have pushed OO.o at my employment, however it has yet to go anywhere. Sales and Marketing teams have a huge say in the tools that are used. I got them to try OO.o, and it actually worked better in some respects. Where it failed them was in presentations and designing newsletters and such. Is this the right tool for that? Maybe not..but yet it is what is in use in most companies. If it were up to me, I would deploy OO.o. Unfortunately, it is not, as IT folks get very little say in what software is run on the end user desktops like it or not.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: 100% compatible
by modmans2ndcoming on Tue 14th Oct 2008 22:26 in reply to "RE[8]: 100% compatible"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

By IT folk, I assume you mean field staff? Since applications support tend to be part of any IT staff and this group, or desktop support, are the group that evaluates and tests perspective applications and make recommendations to the IT decision makers who then budget the costs for the budget year they want to make the purchase. Seems to be that it is IT all the way.

Reply Parent Score: 2