Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Oct 2008 19:58 UTC, submitted by FreeGamer
BeOS & Derivatives It seems like only yesterday when due to a combination of hubris, bad business decisions, and pressure from Apple and Microsoft, Be, Inc. went under, with its assets - including the BeOS - bought up by Palm, who now store it in a filing cabinet somewhere in the attic of the company's Sunnyvale headquarters. Right after Be went under, the OpenBeOS project was started; an effort to recreate the BeOS as open source under the MIT license. This turned out to be a difficult task, and many doubted the project would ever get anywhere. We're seven years down the road now, and the persistence is paying off: the first Haiku alpha is nearer than ever.
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Haiku on real hardware
by truckweb on Fri 24th Oct 2008 12:24 UTC
truckweb
Member since:
2005-07-06

I hope that Haiku will be able to install and run on today hardware, not the hardware of BeOS5 era.

And yes, Haiku should be optimized to run on Netbook (SSD), that would be awesome, light and fun OS on light hardware.

I had so much fun using BeOS5, still have my original CD here.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Haiku on real hardware
by StephenBeDoper on Fri 24th Oct 2008 12:57 in reply to "Haiku on real hardware"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I hope that Haiku will be able to install and run on today hardware, not the hardware of BeOS5 era.


Agreed. Although I do still think it's an advantage that Haiku *can* run acceptably on hardware that old - just did a quick check on vfxweb.com, a used P4 1.8Ghz with 512MB RAM and 40GB of diskspace goes for about $65 these days, and would run BeOS / Haiku beautifully.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Haiku on real hardware
by BiPolar on Fri 24th Oct 2008 13:42 in reply to "RE: Haiku on real hardware"
BiPolar Member since:
2007-07-06

[...] P4 1.8Ghz with 512MB RAM and 40GB [...] and would run BeOS / Haiku beautifully.


It surely does runs beautifully even on a seven years old K7 @ 900 MHz, 256 MB of RAM (minus 8 MB for the IGP) and no swap file :-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Haiku on real hardware
by petterhj on Fri 24th Oct 2008 16:56 in reply to "Haiku on real hardware"
petterhj Member since:
2005-08-19

Haiku runs pretty damn well on the MSI Wind (without SSD though). Netbooks are perfect for running Haiku. Can't wait until WiFi works. Then I'll do the switch (as an old time BeOS User, that won't be a big problem) ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Haiku on real hardware
by Bobthearch on Fri 24th Oct 2008 21:17 in reply to "Haiku on real hardware"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I'll be happy if it runs on an old PII/PIII computer, but with new apps and better drivers. Those 90s machines are readily available, either for free or very cheap (I've restored several and given them away recently, maybe 8 machines total in the last two months). I'd love to set up these old "freebie" machines dual-booting Windows and Haiku, or skipping Windows all together.

Reply Parent Score: 2

JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

I have a dual p3-450 440 GX chipset (server version of the more common 440 BX, but uses up to 2 GB ECC RAM) system with 256 MB RAM and a GeForce 5500 PCI video card (my AGP slot died, it seems: keep in mind, I've had this motherboard since January 2000, and it has been struck by lightning indirectly once, and directly once! That is, via ethernet it was zapped by an indirect zap, and once the house was struck directly while it was powered on) and with the GeForce driver available via BeBits, it ran a version of Haiku well over a year ago just fine (Haiku has made MAJOR progress since then) and was snappy. I actually took a copy of the Screen preferences app and took it back to BeOS to make BeOS 5 run my screen at 2048*1536*32 bits ;) (BeOS R5 doesn't natively know about resolutions higher than 1600*1200)

Sadly, there's no SCSI driver I'm aware of for Haiku for my dual channel Adaptec controller on board, but if you get an RealTek 8169-based Gigabit ethernet controller (easily available new at a lot of stores for about $20 or less) and common USB or PS/2 mice, you'll get good performance. The one minor thing you might need to concern yourself with that hasn't been mentioned yet? A machine that old will likely have a BIOS limitation for hard drives beyond 128 GB that you'd be advised to get fixed before installing on it ;) (Seems PC's have this every few years to deal with ;) )

Reply Parent Score: 3