Linked by David Adams on Tue 28th Oct 2008 17:42 UTC, submitted by DigitalDame
Windows The new OS includes major new user interface updates, and promises to work much better with third-party hardware and software. Can the latest version of the OS wash away the sour taste of Vista? Here's a detailed report and a slideshow of Windows 7 screenshots.
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ennervation
by richmassena on Tue 28th Oct 2008 18:02 UTC
richmassena
Member since:
2006-11-26

It's always remarkable to me how Microsoft can promise so much and yet deliver so little. Every single time they release an OS, they say, "this one may be low-quality, but the next one will have everything we promised for this one, we promise." And people seem to be falling for it again.

Fortunately, you can look at these screenshots to see what won't be in Windows 7. Look, Paint with a ribbon. Who needs this? Calculator with a few extra functions thrown in. Whoever needs this will have a better tool for the job. Post-it notes. Who cares? Desktop widgets. Worthless. A wireless picker could be of limited use, but it's not worth paying for.

I don't use OSX much, but I have to give Apple some credit. For example, the addition Time Machine to Leopard makes it a good value.

Microsoft should rethink how people use computers. As it is, they feel like they've perfected the paradigm, and are just treading water.

I would like to be able to easily manage millions files, over dozens of different disks, and be able to find these files quickly, and reference them, sort them, add metadata, etc. How will Windows help me manage 100,000 emails, millions of photos, web snippets, feeds?

Reply Score: 2

RE: ennervation
by jayson.knight on Tue 28th Oct 2008 18:06 in reply to "ennervation"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

Fortunately, you can look at these screenshots to see what won't be in Windows 7.


Dude, it's a pre-beta. They had to show the folks at the PDC something.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: ennervation
by richmassena on Tue 28th Oct 2008 18:56 in reply to "RE: ennervation"
richmassena Member since:
2006-11-26

"Fortunately, you can look at these screenshots to see what won't be in Windows 7.


Dude, it's a pre-beta. They had to show the folks at the PDC something.
"

I know it's alpha quality software, but that's beside the point. They could have shown us something new instead of putting a new coat of paint on the old system. These updates are pointless, like for example, adding Jezzball to the games and new deck backgrounds to Solitaire would be.

Maybe the company is reluctant to make any promises after most of the features in Longorn were vaporized, but it seems like it would be better marketing to demonstrate substantial changes, even if they are still pre-beta.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: ennervation
by Kroc on Tue 28th Oct 2008 18:08 in reply to "ennervation"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

It's refinement.

Mac users were clamouring for refinement every bit as much as new features. One big hoped for, was the unification of the various themes, and a new finder-- which Leopard mostly delivered.

Windows 7 looks a lot less cluttered so far, and they've really taken to odds the insane number of extra clicks it takes to do anything in Vista. Connecting to a wireless network is a small adventure in of itself - so this kind of refinement (a wireless picker) is one thing in a list of deal-clinchers.

Everybody's got their peeves with Windows - it's refinement, not features, that'll go toward addressing those peeves.

Edited 2008-10-28 18:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: ennervation
by chris_dk on Tue 28th Oct 2008 18:22 in reply to "RE: ennervation"
chris_dk Member since:
2005-07-12


Windows 7 looks a lot less cluttered so far


How do you know that?

From the screenshots that are public it doesn't look that different from Vista - and Vista is pretty cluttered.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ennervation
by richmassena on Tue 28th Oct 2008 19:08 in reply to "RE: ennervation"
richmassena Member since:
2006-11-26

It's refinement.

Mac users were clamouring for refinement every bit as much as new features. One big hoped for, was the unification of the various themes, and a new finder-- which Leopard mostly delivered.

Windows 7 looks a lot less cluttered so far, and they've really taken to odds the insane number of extra clicks it takes to do anything in Vista. Connecting to a wireless network is a small adventure in of itself - so this kind of refinement (a wireless picker) is one thing in a list of deal-clinchers.

Everybody's got their peeves with Windows - it's refinement, not features, that'll go toward addressing those peeves.


My biggest peeve with Microsoft Windows and Office has been that they've changed the way their software works without adding any compelling reason to do so, and at no benefit to me.

A wireless picker is anything but a deal-clincher for me. Dell and IBM have both had that capability for years. There is even a extra position on the wireless switch to activate it. As you can see, what they're presenting is an amateur affair. How is a wireless picker useful if there are so many access points you have to scroll the list. A foldout panel would be better.

Reducing extra clicks is certainly laudable, and I hope they accomplish this. How did that aspect of Vista interface get through QA?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: ennervation
by andrewg on Tue 28th Oct 2008 19:40 in reply to "ennervation"
andrewg Member since:
2005-07-06

Would multti-touch count for anything in your opinion? Just wondering.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ennervation
by richmassena on Tue 28th Oct 2008 20:09 in reply to "RE: ennervation"
richmassena Member since:
2006-11-26

Multi-touch is certainly a nice feature on the iPhone. I don't own one myself, but I've used one enough to see its usefulness. Given the work Microsoft has done with Surface (my assumptions are based on seeing the Surface promotional video), they could have something really nice in the works. If done well, multi-touch can be for zoom, rotate, crop and pan what the scrollwheel is to scroll. I'm almost certain they'll add gesture support as well. My concern with multi-touch is in a similar vein as the ribbon interface. Will it feel bolted-on, working inconsistenly between applications (or only supported in a few applications), or will Microsoft integrate the support into every bit of their software, and wait for others to catch up?

Reply Parent Score: 1