Linked by David Adams on Tue 28th Oct 2008 17:42 UTC, submitted by DigitalDame
Windows The new OS includes major new user interface updates, and promises to work much better with third-party hardware and software. Can the latest version of the OS wash away the sour taste of Vista? Here's a detailed report and a slideshow of Windows 7 screenshots.
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RE[2]: ennervation
by richmassena on Tue 28th Oct 2008 20:09 UTC in reply to "RE: ennervation"
richmassena
Member since:
2006-11-26

Multi-touch is certainly a nice feature on the iPhone. I don't own one myself, but I've used one enough to see its usefulness. Given the work Microsoft has done with Surface (my assumptions are based on seeing the Surface promotional video), they could have something really nice in the works. If done well, multi-touch can be for zoom, rotate, crop and pan what the scrollwheel is to scroll. I'm almost certain they'll add gesture support as well. My concern with multi-touch is in a similar vein as the ribbon interface. Will it feel bolted-on, working inconsistenly between applications (or only supported in a few applications), or will Microsoft integrate the support into every bit of their software, and wait for others to catch up?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: ennervation
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 28th Oct 2008 21:12 in reply to "RE[2]: ennervation"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Will it feel bolted-on, working inconsistenly between applications (or only supported in a few applications), or will Microsoft integrate the support into every bit of their software, and wait for others to catch up?


From what the ever lovely Julie is telling us in the keynote, an app doesn't need to know anything about touch or Windows 7 in order to work with touch. A touch-enabled comptuer will automatically make make menu items have more whitespace (25%) so they're easier to touch. Touch worked just fine on an unaltered installation of Word 2007.

Julie also told that applications can also be tuned towards touch, to support more advanced touch gestures. It was pretty damn cool, actually.

And yeah, I like Julie. Sue me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: ennervation
by leos on Tue 28th Oct 2008 23:46 in reply to "RE[3]: ennervation"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

From what the ever lovely Julie is telling us in the keynote, an app doesn't need to know anything about touch or Windows 7 in order to work with touch.


Working with touch is simple. Hook up a touchscreen to a computer and it will just work. Touches are mouse clicks, drags are mouse drags. No problem.

A touch-enabled comptuer will automatically make make menu items have more whitespace (25%) so they're easier to touch.


If that's true that would be pretty amazing. With the varied mix of toolkits on windows and dozens of different ways of doing things, it would be pretty crazy if Windows could actually consistently increase hit areas on menus and such without breaking stuff. Hard to believe, but I'll wait until I see it.

Julie also told that applications can also be tuned towards touch, to support more advanced touch gestures. It was pretty damn cool, actually.

And yeah, I like Julie. Sue me.


There's something very attractive about touch interfaces. I'm doing some work on them as well and it has its uses, but touchscreens aren't going to replace keyboards or mice for desktops/laptops anytime soon. It's just an additional mode of interaction, not a replacement.

Reply Parent Score: 2