Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 28th Oct 2008 19:02 UTC
Windows Windows 7 is out and about. Microsoft has been unusually secretive about Vista's successor, but now that PDC is under way, they have unveiled the various enhancements to the user interface. Windows 7 might not have any significant under-the-hood changes (in fact, all your applications and devices will still work), but on the outside, Windows 7 represents the biggest change for the Windows user interface ever since Windows 95 came out.
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Great artists steal
by Zenja on Tue 28th Oct 2008 21:41 UTC
Zenja
Member since:
2005-07-06

Taskbar = gimped OSX dock 2001
Desktop Gadgets = gimped BeOS replicants 1999
Libraries = BeOS queries 1997
Explorer Previews = OSX Expose 2005


Keep in mind that Windows 7 will probably be out late 2009-mid 2010. Ah Microsoft, shoving the future down your through for all 90% of the population a decade behind the other computer users.

I cant wait for Windows 8. It will bring us the following:
- sliding window title tabs.
- seperate the maximise and close buttons
- maximise does a resize to fit, not fullscreen
- vertical taskbar, since monitors are widder than they are taller.
- unified menu bar for all applications
- right click directory navigation
- live queries

And in Windows 9, we'll get:
- a preemptive desktop where each view is a seperate thread (pervasive multithreaded OS)
- scheduled performance time for media sources
- a context switch less than 3ms
- customisable node based media path

And in Windows 10, we'll get:
- modular component / servers which can be restarted dynamically.
- A new C++ API which is designed by someone who actually undestands OO.
- A reworked file layout that actually makes sense.

Again, Microsoft is dragging the unwilling populace into the future, 10-15 years behind the competition, whether the people want to or not.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Great artists steal
by Buck on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:27 in reply to "Great artists steal"
Buck Member since:
2005-06-29

It will bring us the following:
- sliding window title tabs

Yeah, I guess that's a given.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Great artists steal
by BluenoseJake on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:42 in reply to "Great artists steal"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Are you really starting spewing that again?

Taskbar = gimped OSX dock 2001


The changes to the taskbar are really kinda minor, and probably reversible. The taskbar has been around for over 14 years. It's still not the dock, as you can tell the difference at a glance between a running app and a app launcher, little dots or triangles don't really do it.


Desktop Gadgets = gimped BeOS replicants 1999


Desktop gadgets have existed for decades, and MS demoed the sidebar with gadgets in the earliest Longhorn builds. The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.

Libraries = BeOS queries 1997


Yeah, like BEOS is the only OS that can search and save File searches. Windows 95 could, only the underlying technology is different. Beos is dead, get over it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Great artists steal
by niemau on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:53 in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.


i see where you're going with this... but, not so fast. TSRs are really not equivalent to desktop widgets. while they could be (in a limited capacity) used for things that widgets might provide nowadays, most people only used TSRs for things like mouse drivers, and did not have any direct knowledge of their existence. not to mention the difference in ease of use. mac desk accessories, better comparison. but, it's not really a fair assessment to say that people who "don't remember" TSRs shouldn't be commenting. not everybody needed knowledge of them, for one. average users probably were just happy that everything was working. not to mention that back in the DOS days, many users were still running classic macs, amigas, C64s, and many others. they'd have no reason to remember TSRs.

just saying...

(edited for clarification)

Edited 2008-10-28 22:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Great artists steal
by Zenja on Wed 29th Oct 2008 02:09 in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
Zenja Member since:
2005-07-06

Are you really starting spewing that again?
The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.


Buddy, the first program I ever typed into a computer was on a teletype printer connected to a Dec PDP11/50 series back in 1978. Thats right, no monitor. My first computer was a Vic20 back in 1981. Terminate & Stay Resident programs are ancestors of Desktop Widgets? The interrupt driven crap that was intended to convey the illusion of running multiple programs under DOS was the ancestor of Desktop Widgets? Can I have some of what your smoking?

My entire quote was about publishing an interface to allow applications to embedd views into the desktop. Geez,

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Great artists steal
by Laurence on Wed 29th Oct 2008 01:41 in reply to "Great artists steal"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I understand the concept of your argument, but the examples you gave were very very poor.
Let me correct a few factual errors you made:


I cant wait for Windows 8. It will bring us the following:
- seperate the maximise and close buttons

They are seperate in classic mode. Always have been.

- vertical taskbar, since monitors are widder than they are taller.

Windows has done this since the dawn of the windows taskbar. Just drag and drop it.

- unified menu bar for all applications

Not everyone likes unified menu bars. I certainly don't.

- right click directory navigation

You'll have to expand on what you mean there, but directory navigation isn't any harder in Windows than in any other OS i've used.

- a preemptive desktop where each view is a seperate thread (pervasive multithreaded OS)

This feature has been around since Windows 2000 (maybe even longer). Granted it's not enabled by default, but the setting isn't hidden away either should anyone want to find it.

- scheduled performance time for media sources

Media processes do get a greater processor schedule than non-media processes. In fact this is one of the very features linux fanboys use against windows.

- customisable node based media path

NTFS holds a great deal of metadata about media and there's plenty more options hidden around XP (for example) if you know where to look.
And in Windows 10, we'll get:
- modular component / servers which can be restarted dynamically.

You mean like windows services?

- A new C++ API which is designed by someone who actually undestands OO.

Many people seem to like .net. Personally I don't, but then it's been some years since I was a heavy developer for the windows platform.

- A reworked file layout that actually makes sense.

Windows directory structures make sense. It's just a pity Windows, its users and its software developers aren't stricter about adhearing to the structure. But I guess that's one of the prices you pay for allowing users to install applications manually rather than via software reposatories


So, to summarise: I don't have a problem with people taking a dislike to Windows (I personally can't stand 90% of Windows releases either). But, for the sanity of this site, please at least keep your grievences factually accurate.

Edited 2008-10-29 01:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Great artists steal
by smashIt on Wed 29th Oct 2008 11:53 in reply to "Great artists steal"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

I cant wait for Windows 8. It will bring us the following:
- seperate the maximise and close buttons

don't know about vista, but in xp they are seperated

- unified menu bar for all applications

unified like in osx? it's one of the worst ui-concepts i've ever seen

- vertical taskbar, since monitors are widder than they are taller.
- right click directory navigation

like in winXP?
http://temp.funtech.org/WinXP-1.png
or like in beos?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Great artists steal
by phoenix on Wed 29th Oct 2008 16:00 in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

"- vertical taskbar, since monitors are widder than they are taller.

like in winXP?
http://temp.funtech.org/WinXP-1.png
or like in beos?
"

Actually, it's been an option since the original taskbar appeared in Windows 95. You can dock it to any side of the monitor. You'd be amazed at how many helpdesk calls we get regarding "broken taskbars" because someone inadvertently dragged theirs to somewhere other than the bottom. ;)

Personally, I've had the taskbar in Windows at the top of the screen, set to auto-hide, since Windows 98.

What I'd like to see in Windows, is the ability to separate the application launcher from the taskbar. Let me put the app launcher at the top of the screen, with the app menu on one side, the systray on the other, and a set of quick launch buttons in the middle, all set to auto-hide. With a separate taskbar at the bottom of the screen that just shows what apps are running. It's a much nicer setup than everything crowded together in one bar.

Reply Parent Score: 2