Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 28th Oct 2008 19:02 UTC
Windows Windows 7 is out and about. Microsoft has been unusually secretive about Vista's successor, but now that PDC is under way, they have unveiled the various enhancements to the user interface. Windows 7 might not have any significant under-the-hood changes (in fact, all your applications and devices will still work), but on the outside, Windows 7 represents the biggest change for the Windows user interface ever since Windows 95 came out.
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RE: Great artists steal
by BluenoseJake on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:42 UTC in reply to "Great artists steal"
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

Are you really starting spewing that again?

Taskbar = gimped OSX dock 2001


The changes to the taskbar are really kinda minor, and probably reversible. The taskbar has been around for over 14 years. It's still not the dock, as you can tell the difference at a glance between a running app and a app launcher, little dots or triangles don't really do it.


Desktop Gadgets = gimped BeOS replicants 1999


Desktop gadgets have existed for decades, and MS demoed the sidebar with gadgets in the earliest Longhorn builds. The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.

Libraries = BeOS queries 1997


Yeah, like BEOS is the only OS that can search and save File searches. Windows 95 could, only the underlying technology is different. Beos is dead, get over it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Great artists steal
by niemau on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:53 in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.


i see where you're going with this... but, not so fast. TSRs are really not equivalent to desktop widgets. while they could be (in a limited capacity) used for things that widgets might provide nowadays, most people only used TSRs for things like mouse drivers, and did not have any direct knowledge of their existence. not to mention the difference in ease of use. mac desk accessories, better comparison. but, it's not really a fair assessment to say that people who "don't remember" TSRs shouldn't be commenting. not everybody needed knowledge of them, for one. average users probably were just happy that everything was working. not to mention that back in the DOS days, many users were still running classic macs, amigas, C64s, and many others. they'd have no reason to remember TSRs.

just saying...

(edited for clarification)

Edited 2008-10-28 22:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Great artists steal
by BluenoseJake on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Great artists steal"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

You can't comment on the history of computers and computer interfaces without knowing about the history of computing and computer interfaces.

It's that simple.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Great artists steal
by alban on Wed 29th Oct 2008 00:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Great artists steal"
alban Member since:
2005-11-15

TSRs with things like a calculator or a pop up telephone list that launched on a key press were used on DOS where I used to work. So you could do something useful while running WordPerfect. They were certainly the functional equivalent of widgets and accessories today.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Great artists steal
by Zenja on Wed 29th Oct 2008 02:09 in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
Zenja Member since:
2005-07-06

Are you really starting spewing that again?
The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.


Buddy, the first program I ever typed into a computer was on a teletype printer connected to a Dec PDP11/50 series back in 1978. Thats right, no monitor. My first computer was a Vic20 back in 1981. Terminate & Stay Resident programs are ancestors of Desktop Widgets? The interrupt driven crap that was intended to convey the illusion of running multiple programs under DOS was the ancestor of Desktop Widgets? Can I have some of what your smoking?

My entire quote was about publishing an interface to allow applications to embedd views into the desktop. Geez,

Reply Parent Score: 3