Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 28th Oct 2008 19:02 UTC
Windows Windows 7 is out and about. Microsoft has been unusually secretive about Vista's successor, but now that PDC is under way, they have unveiled the various enhancements to the user interface. Windows 7 might not have any significant under-the-hood changes (in fact, all your applications and devices will still work), but on the outside, Windows 7 represents the biggest change for the Windows user interface ever since Windows 95 came out.
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RE[2]: Great artists steal
by niemau on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:53 UTC in reply to "RE: Great artists steal"
niemau
Member since:
2007-06-28

The first destop widgets could be considered oldschool DOS TSRs (if you don't remember them, you don't know enough computer history to be even commenting) or Apple desk accessories, both in the mid 80s.


i see where you're going with this... but, not so fast. TSRs are really not equivalent to desktop widgets. while they could be (in a limited capacity) used for things that widgets might provide nowadays, most people only used TSRs for things like mouse drivers, and did not have any direct knowledge of their existence. not to mention the difference in ease of use. mac desk accessories, better comparison. but, it's not really a fair assessment to say that people who "don't remember" TSRs shouldn't be commenting. not everybody needed knowledge of them, for one. average users probably were just happy that everything was working. not to mention that back in the DOS days, many users were still running classic macs, amigas, C64s, and many others. they'd have no reason to remember TSRs.

just saying...

(edited for clarification)

Edited 2008-10-28 22:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Great artists steal
by BluenoseJake on Tue 28th Oct 2008 22:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Great artists steal"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

You can't comment on the history of computers and computer interfaces without knowing about the history of computing and computer interfaces.

It's that simple.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Great artists steal
by niemau on Tue 28th Oct 2008 23:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Great artists steal"
niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

You can't comment on the history of computers and computer interfaces without knowing about the history of computing and computer interfaces.

It's that simple.


um... no, it's not 'that simple'.

actually, you CAN comment on the history of computer interfaces when the particular computer interface being discussed (the freaking taskbar) is the one you're familiar with.

heck, half the people here could probably say "well, geez, back in *my day* we only saw OUR running processes and apps if we ran 'top'!" the other half, that was raised on a strict diet of DOS and windows would likely have no idea what that meant. and, frankly, 'top' is every bit as critical in the 'history of computing and computing interfaces'. furthermore, it's still being used today. regularly.

the history of computing is vast. frankly, you're fairly nuts if you think you can sum up 'people who shouldn't comment' with 'those who don't remember TSRs'.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Great artists steal
by alban on Wed 29th Oct 2008 00:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Great artists steal"
alban Member since:
2005-11-15

TSRs with things like a calculator or a pop up telephone list that launched on a key press were used on DOS where I used to work. So you could do something useful while running WordPerfect. They were certainly the functional equivalent of widgets and accessories today.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Great artists steal
by niemau on Wed 29th Oct 2008 02:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Great artists steal"
niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

TSRs with things like a calculator or a pop up telephone list that launched on a key press were used on DOS where I used to work. So you could do something useful while running WordPerfect. They were certainly the functional equivalent of widgets and accessories today.


i made clear in my post that certain functionality was common with today's widgets. i also made clear that the ease of use and knowledge of this functionality is what set TSRs apart from today's widgets. TSRs were more likely used in other contexts (hardware drivers, etc) than that by most users. those users usually used them in an out-of-sight-out-of-mind sort of way. that is my point. they are not equivalent to today's widgets because of that.

Reply Parent Score: 1