Linked by David Adams on Thu 20th Nov 2008 04:26 UTC
Novell and Ximian Two years ago, Microsoft and Novell inked a landmark deal on patents and Linux-to-Windows interoperability. According to Microsoft and Novell, it's a deal that has shown dramatic momentum in its second year, with a triple digit percentage increase in customers for a total tally of more than 200 customers. "I was surprised at the number of over 200 customers, so I actually went back and double checked it just to make sure," Susan Heystee, General Manager for Global Strategic Alliances at Novell told InternetNews.com. "That represents over 250 percent growth in terms of the number of customers that are part of the partnership which is really great. A real positive surprise has been the great customer momentum."
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RE[3]: Good for them.
by Phocean on Thu 20th Nov 2008 09:03 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Good for them."
Phocean
Member since:
2007-07-07

The last OpenSuse is far from being bloated at all, and all the community should look at it seriously.
It is polished, stable and succeed where Ubuntu still fails : stable set up tools, no need of the terminal.

That's why I would only recommend Suse to beginners.
And even if I am a power user, I appreciate to have a user-friendly linux as a desktop and focus on the real work.

Honnestly, there is really too much noise about the agreements, that anyway don't concern OpenSuse.
Stop the troll, turn the page.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Good for them.
by Clinton on Thu 20th Nov 2008 16:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Good for them."
Clinton Member since:
2005-07-05

The last OpenSuse is far from being bloated at all, and all the community should look at it seriously.
It is polished, stable and succeed where Ubuntu still fails : stable set up tools, no need of the terminal.


Ubuntu fails at stable set up tools and needing the terminal? That's news to me. I just set up several Ubuntu machines and experienced no problems with the setup, nor did I have to use the terminal.

I do use the terminal because it is a powerful tool on Linux -- actually, the terminal is one of those "killer apps" on Linux in my opinion -- but I certainly didn't have to.

However, even if Ubuntu did "fail" at these two things, being Debian based, it would still be worth the hassle just for dpkg.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Good for them.
by KugelKurt on Fri 21st Nov 2008 19:41 in reply to "RE[4]: Good for them."
KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

Ubuntu fails at stable set up tools and needing the terminal? That's news to me. I just set up several Ubuntu machines and experienced no problems with the setup, nor did I have to use the terminal.

I have an honest question: How do I fine-grained modifications of a user account -- which groups one account belongs to? The user accounts applet is too simplistic for me. I used the terminal to modify accounts.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Good for them.
by Herolint on Thu 20th Nov 2008 20:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Good for them."
Herolint Member since:
2008-11-20

The last OpenSuse is far from being bloated at all


Things may have changed since I last used it, but historically, OpenSuSE has indeed been slow and bloated. On top of that, the net install wasn't very intuitive and if you didn't use the net install, you had to download a big DVD or several CD images.

It is polished, stable and succeed where Ubuntu still fails : stable set up tools, no need of the terminal.


I'd have to agree with the other commenter. This statement is not accurate.

That's why I would only recommend Suse to beginners.


You are entitled to your own opinions, but I'd prefer to see some positive comments about why you feel that way rather than an inaccurate tearing down of another distro. They're all Linux and therefore all good, right?

Honnestly, there is really too much noise about the agreements


The Novell and Microsoft agreement is lame and Novell contributes a ton to OpenSuSE, so they're related. The story is about the agreement, so perhaps we should turn the page on the OpenSuSE vs. Ubuntu discussion and come back to the page about the lame Microsoft deal.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Good for them.
by KugelKurt on Fri 21st Nov 2008 19:38 in reply to "RE[4]: Good for them."
KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

Things may have changed since I last used it, but historically, OpenSuSE has indeed been slow and bloated.

openSUSE is quite new and I don't think that it has a long history. Old S.u.S.E. releases may have been bloated but that was long ago.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Good for them.
by OMRebel on Thu 20th Nov 2008 21:49 in reply to "RE[3]: Good for them."
OMRebel Member since:
2005-11-14

You make the comment for others to stop trolling, when you trolled in your own post? I've run Ubuntu for years, and I do not have to use the terminal to setup Ubuntu. That statement you made was completely FUD, and it does nothing but take away from your credibility. If you want OpenSuse to succeed, then have it do so on it's merits. Spreading BS around around its competition isn't doing you any good.

I hope OpenSuse has gotten rid of the bloat. That would include fixing Yast, which was horrible slow the last time I tried Suse.

Reply Parent Score: 2