Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th Nov 2008 12:42 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Netbooks are still all the rage these days, but according to Intel, this is going to change soon. The company has stated that they first thought that netbooks, who are almost exclusively powered by Intel chips, would be for emerging markets, but as it turns out, they are especially popular in Europe and North America. Intel claims that while these devices are "fine for an hour", they are not something for day to day use. And AMD? They are ignoring the market altogether.
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RE[2]: Loongson
by spiderman on Fri 28th Nov 2008 15:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Loongson"
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

Sorry, I didn't say x86 was dead.
That's a trick of the english language. "dead end" does not mean "dead", it is a whole different concept. It just means "no road through", it has nothing to do with "dead"...
In most other languages, there is a different word for those two concepts. for instance, in french, they say "impasse" for "dead end" and "mort" for "dead". the english language is just too poor so it reuses the same word with very different meaning just by adding another word. That is confusing, but we have to live with it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Loongson
by leech on Fri 28th Nov 2008 15:42 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Impasse is a word that works just as well in English, but then you still will always have the knee jerk responses.

Either way, I agree with you. I have never liked the x86 architecture, but have accepted the fact also that the better technologies hardly ever win out.

Just look at the Windows vs. Every other OS out there. Windows did not win out because of being the better technological operating system. It won out because of being bundled with every PC since it was available. Right place at the right time. I could only imagine if back then the Mac OS or Amiga Workbench had ran on x86 hardware and had been compatible with all the applications...

Anyhow, all of this is off topic. It's a shame that (as crappy as they were) Cyrix and the others that used to make x86 processors all died out, except AMD and Intel. I guess Via is out there in there small niche. But really, we need more competition in every processor slice so that we as consumers will get more benefits.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Loongson
by siride on Fri 28th Nov 2008 16:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

It's called compounding and it's an extremely effective way of building new words and phrases. Sorry you don't get it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Loongson
by BluenoseJake on Fri 28th Nov 2008 18:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Actually, dead end means that there is no progress pass the current location. as in the road comes to a dead end. I see no signs that x86 is at a dead end, impasse, whatever. x86 has effectively taken over the PC, workstation, server, HPC and Mac markets, and is moving into netbooks and smartphones. that's not a dead end, that's a total and utter domination of multiple markets.

How anybody can claim that x86 has hit a dead end is beyond me.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[4]: Loongson
by spiderman on Mon 1st Dec 2008 09:07 in reply to "RE[3]: Loongson"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

The Windows PC and mac OS X markets are dead ends.
It has nothing to do with the market, it's technical.
Don't worry, Microsoft, Apple and Intel will continue to make billions of dollars from their crap. That doesn't mean they will move us forward. You confuse what you call the market with progress.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Loongson
by abraxas on Fri 28th Nov 2008 18:23 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

I still think your point isn't valid. How is x86 a dead end? It's the same story. It's been said for years but x86 continues to grow in the personal computer market (Apple) and into embedded markets. I haven't seen an argument by anyone here that can make the case that x86 is a dead end. It's wishful thinking at this point and until a company can make a processor with the price and performance of x86 it's here to stay. Point me to one next gen processor that makes the cut and I might concede.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Loongson
by tyrione on Fri 28th Nov 2008 20:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

Sorry, I didn't say x86 was dead.
That's a trick of the english language. "dead end" does not mean "dead", it is a whole different concept. It just means "no road through", it has nothing to do with "dead"...
In most other languages, there is a different word for those two concepts. for instance, in french, they say "impasse" for "dead end" and "mort" for "dead". the english language is just too poor so it reuses the same word with very different meaning just by adding another word. That is confusing, but we have to live with it.


That's not a trick of the English language. Dead being instantaneously over/deceased/kicked-the-bucket/six-feet under/ doesn't mean no viable long-term future which is what dead end describes in IT terms.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Loongson
by StephenBeDoper on Sat 29th Nov 2008 17:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Loongson"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

More "x86-killers" have come and gone in the last fifteen years than I can count offhand, I'd say that x86 is probably the farthest from being a dead end that it has ever been.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Loongson
by sbergman27 on Sat 29th Nov 2008 18:14 in reply to "RE[3]: Loongson"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I'd say that x86 is probably the farthest from being a dead end that it has ever been.

Only in one segment of the total processor market. What percentage of PDAs and cell phones have used x86 over the years?

It really comes down to whether consumers consider netbooks to be small laptops, web and email appliances, or something else. x86's advantage evaporates if the machine is not considered a small laptop. I suspect that geeks are more inclined to look to the devices for small laptops, and regular folks to look to them for their web and email appliance needs. And that at this price point, its the regular folks that will matter.

Edited 2008-11-29 18:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3