Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 29th Nov 2008 21:22 UTC
Linux Even though there are a lot of happy people using Apple's iPhone very happily, there's also a group of people who are not so happy, most likely because of Apple's rather strict policies regarding applications and developers. While most of these people would just jailbreak the thing, some take it a step further - by installing another operating system. Yes, Linux now runs on the iPhone (1st gen/2nd gen, and the 1st gen iPod Touch).
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RE[2]: Wha?
by sbergman27 on Mon 1st Dec 2008 02:33 UTC in reply to "RE: Wha?"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

The kernel folks can blame the driver manufacturers while ignoring the real problem--if you had a stable API and ABI whether the driver is proprietary or open source wouldn't matter worth a damn. The driver would work. Come on guys, Solaris has gotten this right for years now.

Question: If Sun's strategy is so great compared to the Linux strategy... how come hardware support for Solaris/OpenSolaris is so poor compared to that of Linux? Solaris is about the same age as Linux (1992), and OpenSolaris has been out for a few years.

Despite any theoretical arguments you might have, the Linux strategy has actually *worked* better than the Solaris strategy that you are advocating.

Edited 2008-12-01 02:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Wha?
by darknexus on Mon 1st Dec 2008 11:59 in reply to "RE[2]: Wha?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Actually, strategy doesn't come into play here at all.
Why does Solaris have less drivers? Simple answer: because until recently, there was no vested interest on running Solaris on any hardware but that which Sun endorsed. It is only recently that interest has really arisen in Solaris on general-purpose machines other than SUN workstations and servers. Remember, Solaris was designed as a corporate os for servers and, to some extent, workstations. On the server side, supporting every bit of hardware is less important than supporting a few hardware combinations to their fullest extent. Desktop interest in Solaris has only come about within the past few years.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Wha?
by apoclypse on Mon 1st Dec 2008 19:42 in reply to "RE[3]: Wha?"
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

Regardless of that fact Linux supports more hardware NOW. All those who have complained about Linux so far seem to want Linux to support more hardware NOW. If that is the case they better not hold their breath that Solaris will get there anytime soon. Solaris is going to have issues with hardware for years to come, Stable ABI or not. It would be more likely that some enterprising hacker will write a driver for the hardware you are bitching about than for you to see a Solaris driver written by the manufacturer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Wha?
by sbergman27 on Mon 1st Dec 2008 21:00 in reply to "RE[3]: Wha?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Why does Solaris have less drivers? Simple answer: because until recently, there was no vested interest on running Solaris on any hardware but that which Sun endorsed.

If the stable internal kernel abi of OpenSolaris was going to encourage manufacturers (or third parties) to target it, that would have happened by now. Three and a half years of OpenSolaris is plenty long to observe any such effect there, and we should have seen lots of *new and current* devices supported by OpenSolaris that Linux doesn't support. We don't see that.

Regarding "not new" devices, OpenSolaris might gradually accumulate additional drivers, which require less maintenance, in that category. But that's the category where Linux especially shines, anyway, so the bar is set pretty high there.

Edited 2008-12-01 21:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4