Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 00:30 UTC
Linux A next-generation package manager called Nix provides a simple distribution-independent method for deploying a binary or source package on different flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, Fedora, and Red Hat. Even better, Nix does not interfere with existing package managers. Unlike existing package managers, Nix allows different versions of software to live side by side, and permits sane rollbacks of software upgrades.
Thread beginning with comment 341145
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
...
by Hiev on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 01:27 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

We are heading to the year 2010, and Linux is still suffering of this basic problem. sad, really really sad.

Reply Score: -7

RE: ...
by Windows Sucks on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 01:34 in reply to "..."
Windows Sucks Member since:
2005-11-10

We are heading to the year 2010, and Linux is still suffering of this basic problem. sad, really really sad.


This is a situation where people are making a problem to fit a solution. I almost never, ever have a problem in Ubuntu. Still have some issues some times with Red Hat but not like I used to.

I still think a combo of how Apple does it and a package manager backend for updates would be great. I love how easy it is to install Apps on my Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by Brendan on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 04:03 in reply to "RE: ..."
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

This is a situation where people are making a problem to fit a solution. I almost never, ever have a problem in Ubuntu. Still have some issues some times with Red Hat but not like I used to.


The dependency problem on Linux does exist, regardless of whether you have to sort out all the problems yourself or if there's a huge team of maintainers who sort the problems out for you. The fact that you think there's no problem just means that the Ubuntu maintainers are doing a good job of hiding the problem.

The fact that you need a package manager and a large team of maintainers is the problem. Another package manager (with another large group of maintainers) won't help.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by apoclypse on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 04:23 in reply to "RE: ..."
apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

Yeah but the issue is removing apps in OSX. There is a lot of garbage still strung around even after you remove the app. You still have to use third party tools to remove these files easily, or if you know the location of the files you can delete them yourself. Removing applications in Linux(in my case Ubuntu) is pretty straight forward and you can purge all files associated with the application easily. Not to mention that OSX is far from consistent when it comes to installation. Just like Windows there are many different installers, unlike windows, some of those installers don't have away to uninstall the application.

Besides that I'm not a fan of having these huge blobs taking up resources when shared resources is better in both security and in resource usage. Why should I have o redownload the Gimp when all that needs to be updated is libjpg? Don't get me wrong I love OSX (its now my primary desktop) but that doesn't mean that I don't find issues with the way it handles packages. Ease of use usually comes at a price, in OSX's case is that they made the system easy but unmanageable.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: ...
by centos_user on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 01:47 in reply to "..."
centos_user Member since:
2008-11-16

"We are heading to the year 2010, and Linux is still suffering of this basic problem. sad, really really sad."


I find NO facts to back this statement up, if a customer is paying for RHEL entitlements and I had a package 1 time in a new upgrade from RHEL5.1 to RHEL5.2 in the channel and it was fixed in the morning. ***Take in consideration it was added to the channel in RHN that day! I hardly think this is an issue any longer. Even so with RHEL Support open a ticket, post the info and it is fixed case closed. People are human, they make mistakes so I would say they stay on top of them a lot better than the fallacies of a Windows OS. You can actually see what makes the OS tick and make changes to it unlike the closed source counter parts.


So I say being Open Source is a lot more than complaining about something with the current distro's it is NOT an issue...

Meanwhile, yum/apt/yast are awesome package installers along with the other utilities from other distro's I give them kudos for keeping something very complex down to a level where users can work with it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by Hiev on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 03:05 in reply to "RE: ..."
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

What a load, this is not about being closed or open,or to use apt this or yum that, it is about making a freaking standar already, so I make one package that I know it will work for any distro for any version.

They are all good to work together in polytic issues like drm, patents and Open document but for the issues that matter they are still pre-school in organization, no, I think pre-school children can be even more organized.

Sucks.

Edited 2008-12-23 03:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: -1