Linked by David Adams on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 16:40 UTC, submitted by judgen
Internet & Networking Most Firefox users don't realize that Firefox's current existence is owed almost exclusively to its search partnership with Google wherein Mozilla Corp receives a portion of ad revenue from Google queries initiated from Firefox's search bar. This revenue amounts to tens of millions of dollars. Internet users the world over, who are currently reaping the benefit of a renewed browser war with exciting innovation instead of Microsoft-dominated stagnation, can thank Google for that state of affairs. But now that Google has itself entered the fray with Chrome, what does that mean for the Firefox/Google relationship?
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RE: Reinventing the wheel :(
by dragossh on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 20:20 UTC in reply to "Reinventing the wheel :("
dragossh
Member since:
2008-12-16

FF is open source as everyone know so they must participate in the development of FF instead of developing there own browser.

They must? Um, no.

I hear everyone bitching about Google creating their own browser instead of contributing to FF. Well, Firefox is not the end-all-be-all of web browsers. It's going to be replaced by something better, sooner or later.

I, for one, am welcoming Chrome and I am waiting for a Mac-based version. Once that is available, I'll never look back to Safari/Firefox. Chrome is the BeOS of browsers, IMHO.

Don't be afraid of change, people.

Reply Parent Score: 2

microFawad Member since:
2005-12-09

Don't be afraid of change, people.


lols...who's afraid of change my friend.
I was just thinking that why not improve a current project instead of creating from scratch.

This is one of the biggest problem in open source community that many people start new projects instead of focusing and improving the current one.
So the end result of this is that the effort and ideas become distributed. Suppose a project contains 3 great features and another project stared developing the same sort of app and it may contain 2 good features. So why not combine all those good features in a single app

The truth is that many people do so because of biases or sometimes to get fame or sometimes because of ego that why not this project is running under my name or under my management ;)

Edited 2008-12-23 20:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

This is one of the biggest problem in open source community that many people start new projects instead of focusing and improving the current one.
So the end result of this is that the effort and ideas become distributed. Suppose a project contains 3 great features and another project stared developing the same sort of app and it may contain 2 good features. So why not combine all those good features in a single app

Because maybe, just maybe, the original project (Firefox) is limited in some ways, and some developers feel that they can do better? In the end, if Chrome keeps Mozilla on the edge of their coding seats and bringing on improvements that would have likely not appeared otherwise (or at least as fast), then it couldn't have been a better win for everyone (especially Firefox users).

Mozilla could certainly learn a thing or two about bloat, memory leaks, memory use, stability, and general responsiveness. If Chrome ends up getting big enough, Mozilla will be forced to do something--just as they forced Microsoft to do something with the crap that was IE5. Or was it 6? It remained stagnant so long I can't even remember.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Reinventing the wheel :(
by Delgarde on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 22:43 in reply to "RE: Reinventing the wheel :("
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Chrome is the BeOS of browsers, IMHO.


What, doomed to have a small devoted following but no real market penetration?

Yeah, probably true... outside of the geek friends who'd always be enthusiastic about something like this, I don't know anyone who's even heard of Chrome, much less tried using it. It's a good browser, no question, but Google will have to do a lot more to promote it if they expect it to catch on.

Reply Parent Score: 1