Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 11th Jan 2009 10:54 UTC, submitted by Hiev
Mono Project Arstechnica reports that Mono, an open source implementation of .NET runtime, is bringing Microsoft's development technologies to some unexpected places, including the iPhone, Android, and the Wii.
Thread beginning with comment 343082
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Toad
Member since:
2005-11-27

I see you couldn't find anything wrong in what I wrote...

If you are really a pro like you fictitiously claim to be then you would provide some links that back your claim. You have yet to explain why you brought up the GAC which has little to nothing to do with the registry.

If you had any knowledge, you should know that COM that preceded .net used registry to enable COM components (.exe,.dll). It stored information about version, interfaces clasid progid and much more in the registry, metadata that in .net is stored either in .net assembly or GAC, to register .dll in GAC is optional in .net, but is used to share componets, and manage version.
I just showed you that with .net microsoft HAS REMOVED the dependency from the registry. This is basic knowledge.


FYI the configuration files accessible by System.Configuration have the following drawbacks:
[i]"You use one of the Save methods to write configuration information. Note that the user or process that writes must have the following permissions: ....

Of course files must have right permission, this is basic both in Windows as in Linux...

Instead an MVP advised us to use the registry as MS has recommended here...

I would suggest that you shoose better advisors in the future. Registry is the OLD way of storing application data.

If you do not have any legitimate links to back up your so called facts, then you sir are a charlatan.

I see that I hit a nerve somewhere...
I won't spend any of mine time for you, I dislike fanboys that let their libido gets in their way. You are welcome to post any inaccuracy on what I have written.
[/q]

Reply Parent Score: 2

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

You are welcome to back up your claims with actual references to MS documentation. Until then what you post here is either inaccurate or fraudulent.

Oh, just because I expose you for the charlatan you are I am a fanboy? Try supporting your claims buddy, your blind MS fanboism doesn't bode well you.

Reply Parent Score: 0

lsls Member since:
2006-11-13

The origin of this whole discussion is this ambiguous sentence:

I mean come on, don't you find it odd that your Mono apps compile to exe and dlls with the need for a Windows like registry on Linux/Mac?


I think everybody is interpreting this sentence as "Mono compiles to exe/dll, and due to this fact, it needs a Windows like registry". Interpreted in this way, the sentence is obviously wrong, since Mono nor .NET require the registry to locate and load exe/dlls (and that's why the GAC was introduced in the discussion).

After reading your replies, I think you were using exe/dll and the registry as two independent examples of Windows technology brought to Linux/Mac. Interpreted in this way, the validity of the sentence is also debatable.

I personally don't find anything odd about using dll/exe in Linux. At least not odder than using .class or other extensions tied to languages or frameworks. Exe/dll files are based on the Portable Executable (PE) format, which is used by Windows, but not deeply tied to it (in fact, it is based on a modified version of the Unix COFF file format).

About the registry, if you want to imply that you need the registry to write .net applications, that's not true. The .NET framework includes classes for accessing the registry, but you don't need to use them. The System.Configuration api provides all you need for reading/writing application settings, and you are not forced to read/write configuration files from "Program Files". The settings infrastructure stores user specific settings into the users directory. Visual Studio even has a visual designer for managing application settings. In any case, the settings infrastructure is fully pluggable and could use a database backed if you wanted. You'll find more info here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8eyb2ct1(VS.80).aspx

Reply Parent Score: 2