Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 11th Jan 2009 10:54 UTC, submitted by Hiev
Mono Project Arstechnica reports that Mono, an open source implementation of .NET runtime, is bringing Microsoft's development technologies to some unexpected places, including the iPhone, Android, and the Wii.
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adkilla
Member since:
2005-07-07

Then both of you noobs are welcome to point out to segedunum and me with links from MS documentation, that what you claim is the new way of doing things.

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Reply Parent Score: 0

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Look at *anything* in all of system.configuration. There are a few hundred classes, all of which have to do with app.config and user.config, not the registry

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.configuration.aspx

a google of "configuration .net" would have led you to about 37 million pages all talking about it, again, nothing to do with the registry

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&rlz=1C1GGLS_enCA309CA309&sa=X&oi=...

If you don't want to wade through millions of blog posts, here is a pretty good tutorial on codeproject, complete with examples on how to use the configuration api. Again, nothing to do with the registry

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/SystemConfiguration.aspx

Reply Parent Score: 2

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

These links do not state that app.config and user.config are meant replace storage of configuration that is handled by the registry in .Net applications.

I have posted in this thread about those APIs and are nothing new to me. What you still haven't proven is that MS expects .Net developers to use these classes and not the registry! Get it?

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Reply Parent Score: 0

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

This is null and void on a few levels:

a google of "configuration .net" would have led you to about 37 million pages all talking about it, again, nothing to do with the registry

Great, except this has absolutely nothing to do with configuration of the application. It is about persistable settings and data that needs to be read and written by the application in a reasonably fluid way (short of using a database). App.config does not fit this use case and Microsoft will disown you if you try. If you'd read any of those pages you would have found that out.

Again, nothing to do with the registry

You keep writing 'nothing to do with the registry' as if that will somehow magicallymake every .Net application ported to Mono Ok, but it doesn't as has been consistently pointed out in this thread, explain why Mono has had to engineer registry support in if .Net applications have 'nothing to do with the registry'. The above use case that I have described, I would hazard a very good guess, is exactly why.

Reply Parent Score: 2