Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 12th Jan 2009 22:51 UTC
KDE When KDE 4.0 was first released, it was met with quite some criticism. Even though people saw the huge potential, the lack of functionality and stability, as well as quite a few bugs detracted from the experience. The KDE developers continued to work on implementing their relatively radical vision, and with the release of KDE 4.2 creeping ever closer, it seems they're well on their way.
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_txf_
Member since:
2008-03-17

AAAAARGH!

Why do people insist something has bad usability, when they don't like something?

Do you speak for every user? are you a usability expert?

It is alright to say that you don't like it, or that it does not work for you. Just don't hide behind usability.

Usability is about making it usable for the majority. Some won't like it, which is why there are alternatives (contrary to gnome or osx).

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

AAAAARGH!

Why do people insist something has bad usability, when they don't like something?

Do you speak for every user? are you a usability expert?

It is alright to say that you don't like it, or that it does not work for you. Just don't hide behind usability.

Usability is about making it usable for the majority. Some won't like it, which is why there are alternatives (contrary to gnome or osx).


I find it difficult to use the KickOff menu. It is more than a matter of just not liking it ... it is very awkward to use (for me at least).

Similarly with the default KDE4 Oxygen theme ... the scroll bars and Window resize "handle" in the lower left corner of Windows are hard to use (as well as visually jarring).

Hard to use == poor usability (or so I thought, anyway).

Fortunately, both of these are very easy to overcome in KDE4, simply by selecting an alternative option in each case instead of the default.

In GNOME, it is relatively easy to overcome the lack of a clipboard manager in the default setup by simply installing an applet called glipper.

http://glipper.sourceforge.net/

Unfortunately, in GNOME, it is not so easy to get around the difficult-to-use file selection dialog boxes.

Edited 2009-01-14 10:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

I wont argue on oxygen. But, as I've said before I dislike kickoff myself.

However I am not disguising my dislike by saying it has poor usability.

I am not the sum total of the users in kde or the world.

What annoys me is that everyone feels that their own personal preferences should suddenly be counted as a usability argument.

Also "hard to use" does not automatically mean bad usability (however in this context it is true).

Reply Parent Score: 2