Linked by Rahul on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 18:33 UTC
Fedora Core The latest Fedora development snapshot makes Ext4 the default file system and adds experimental support for the next generation btrfs filesystem. "According to current plans, version 11 of Fedora, which is expected to arrive in late May, will use Ext4 as its standard file system. That's what the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo) recently decided, following a heated discussion in an IRC meeting. If however Ext3's successor encounters big problems with the pre-release versions of Fedora 11, the developers will dump that plan and revert to Ext3."
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RE[2]: bleeding edge
by netean on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 20:37 UTC in reply to "RE: bleeding edge"
netean
Member since:
2006-01-08

not a troll a genuine question:

why should I care what file system my computer uses? what difference does EXT4/EXT3/Fat32/ntfs really make.

As an end-user will it really matter?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: bleeding edge
by shiny on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 20:58 in reply to "RE[2]: bleeding edge"
shiny Member since:
2005-08-09

not a troll a genuine question:

why should I care what file system my computer uses? what difference does EXT4/EXT3/Fat32/ntfs really make.

As an end-user will it really matter?


As a JOE you shouldn't care. You might experience slightly better performance with ext4 and hopefully no data loss. In general the distro developers should choose the "best" defaults for you. Which is why I'm a bit worried, but curious at the same time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: bleeding edge
by zlynx on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 21:00 in reply to "RE[2]: bleeding edge"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

Yes it matters.

I have been using Reiser4 on my laptop for years now. It's performance has been much better than Reiser3 or EXT3.

Improved disk layout via delayed allocations and the like mean that a seek-challenged drive like a laptop's can write new files to disk much more quickly.

Improved directory indexing means that email files in very large maildir stores (like what Evolution uses for IMAP cache) can be accessed very quickly. This also improves speed for GIT operations.

In my case, Reiser4's full data journaling has helped a lot when -mm series kernels go bad and I have to force power off to get the laptop back. I never ended with screwed up email directories with Reiser4.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: bleeding edge
by AdamW on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 22:25 in reply to "RE[2]: bleeding edge"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

It has a significant effect on performance - how the filesystem works can affect how well it works on operations involving large amounts of files, either sequential or randomly ordered. It also has implications for data safety: properly implemented journalized filesystems are far less likely to lose data in a hard power-off than others.

One interesting upcoming area is performance on SSDs. Using ext4 and, to a greater extent, btrfs will lead to significantly better performance on SSDs than ext3.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: bleeding edge
by satan666 on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 22:27 in reply to "RE[2]: bleeding edge"
satan666 Member since:
2008-04-18

not a troll a genuine question:

why should I care what file system my computer uses? what difference does EXT4/EXT3/Fat32/ntfs really make.

As an end-user will it really matter?

In addition to what the others said already, I'll give you a simple example. Do this test. Pick a file that is larger than 4 GB. Copy the file in a fat32 partition. Check the size of the file after copying it in the fat32 partition. Is it the same?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: bleeding edge
by shiny on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 23:33 in reply to "RE[3]: bleeding edge"
shiny Member since:
2005-08-09


In addition to what the others said already, I'll give you a simple example. Do this test. Pick a file that is larger than 4 GB. Copy the file in a fat32 partition. Check the size of the file after copying it in the fat32 partition. Is it the same?


Except you can't copy a >4gb file on fat32 partition. But yes, large files do take more space on fat32 and ntfs partitions than on ext3. Not by much, though.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: bleeding edge
by gilboa on Fri 23rd Jan 2009 09:16 in reply to "RE[2]: bleeding edge"
gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

not a troll a genuine question:

why should I care what file system my computer uses? what difference does EXT4/EXT3/Fat32/ntfs really make.

As an end-user will it really matter?


It does.
E.g. A brts aware installer can revert to a previous version of your root file-system, in-case something goes horribly wrong during an upgrade / installation.
No more "I just installed an upgrade and it bricked my OS".

- Gilboa

Reply Parent Score: 2