Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 14th Feb 2009 12:55 UTC
Google A major complaint about Google's Chrome web browser has been that so far, it is still not available on anything other than Windows. Google promised to deliver Chrome to Mac OS X and Linux as well, but as it turns out, this is a little harder than they anticipated, Ben Goodger, Google's Chrome interface lead, has explained in an email. It has also been revealed what toolkit the Linux version of Chrome will use: Gtk+.
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QT4 apps on Gnome
by chemical_scum on Sat 14th Feb 2009 23:18 UTC
chemical_scum
Member since:
2005-11-02

I am a Gnome user but I use a number of QT4 Apps on Gnome such as Avogadro. There is a Clearlooks theme for QT4 and then the apps look quite at home on Gnome. I wouldn't mind Chrome being on QT4.

I think it was mad for Google not to have developed Chrome on QT as a real cross platform app in the first place. Their arguments for not doing so are pretty lame and don't hold water.

It is time Google developers realized that they should be building applications as cross platform from the get go.

Reply Score: 5

RE: QT4 apps on Gnome
by nobody on Sun 15th Feb 2009 00:50 in reply to "QT4 apps on Gnome"
nobody Member since:
2006-06-02

Actually, you are quite wrong. Their arguments are far from "lame".

Google simply acknowledges that there are strengths and weaknesses in each platform, and that to use the "lowest common denominator" would be to discard some potentially useful features of other platforms. Does QT4 support Core Data or the upcoming Grand Central for example?

Really -- the Linux brigade should be grateful that Google are even bothering to do more than a simple Wine-port.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: QT4 apps on Gnome
by adkilla on Sun 15th Feb 2009 07:39 in reply to "RE: QT4 apps on Gnome"
adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

Does QT4 support Core Data or the upcoming Grand Central for example?

What makes you think it never will?

FYI, Qt supports using Direct3D on Windows for raster operations. On Mac, they support CoreVideo/CoreAudio for media playback.

The above are examples that Qt does use subsystem features. Snow Leopard is still a while away. Thus any apps using the features you mentioned is non-existent.

With the crap Apple pulled off with Carbon-64, it would be wise not to place any bets on finalized features in Snow Leopard till it ships!

-Ad

Edited 2009-02-15 07:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: QT4 apps on Gnome
by chemical_scum on Sun 15th Feb 2009 13:11 in reply to "RE: QT4 apps on Gnome"
chemical_scum Member since:
2005-11-02

Does QT4 support Core Data or the upcoming Grand Central for example?

Really -- the Linux brigade should be grateful that Google are even bothering to do more than a simple Wine-port.


Really you Apple obsessives get me down. You don't want a parallel release of Chrome for all major platforms you want one that not only uses some of the special features of OS X but also upcoming features that are not yet even implemented.

wtf should I care we can both use Crossover Chromium until the native ports come out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: QT4 apps on Gnome
by Daniel Borgmann on Sun 15th Feb 2009 14:14 in reply to "QT4 apps on Gnome"
Daniel Borgmann Member since:
2005-07-08

I wouldn't be interested in running Chrome on any system, if it would be a cross-platform Qt application. Not because I have anything against Qt, it's a great toolkit and I generally love using applications using it. But the browser is a different thing. Chrome is not filling any holes, there are fantastic native browsers on any platform, and then there is Firefox.

The one selling point Chrome really has, is that it works that tiny bit faster and slicker than every other browser. It's not any big feature that makes the difference with Chrome, it's the tiniest details in the user interface and performance.

Much of the Chrome interface is already custom anyway, and a native port gives them the control they need to make it work just right for the browser, while also respecting platform standards. If Chrome would use exactly the same interface on Mac and Linux however, I wouldn't want to use it, period (Firefox has exactly that problem, they band-aid the major issues, but smaller issues always remain).

I am very much looking forward to the Mac port of Chrome. A fast, native browser that beats Safari in ergonomics? I'm sold! Neither Safari nor Firefox make me entirely happy right now, but yet another cross-platform browser wouldn't even be a competition.

On Linux/GNOME I am very curious what they will do, but I think it will be the hardest platform for them to get right.

Reply Parent Score: 2