Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 16th Feb 2009 14:06 UTC
Legal In a textbook example of "dweilen met de kraan open", the landmark trial against Torrent website The Pirate Bay will take off today in Sweden. The founders of the torrent website are charged with aiding millions of internet users gain access to illegal content. Basically the entire entertainment industry is amassing against The Pirate Bay, making this one of the biggest trials against internet file sharing in history.
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Never let go
by ephracis on Mon 16th Feb 2009 15:07 UTC
ephracis
Member since:
2007-09-23

I am very proud to be from Sweden and I hope that the trial will go well (even though I do not personally like to use TPB). No matter what happens it will be no more than a fart in space as far as the pirates are concerned.

More interesting though is the Swedish Spotify which is really gaining popularity, at least over here. When a Spotify for movies and series is released it may actually be able to take on piracy. All we need then is a native client for Linux.

Maybe you should do an article on that?

Reply Score: 6

RE: Never let go
by Valhalla on Mon 16th Feb 2009 16:58 in reply to "Never let go"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

Being from Sweden aswell, I have noticed the whole 'filesharing' thing getting alot of media coverage here during the past 10 months or so. Being of the 'older' generation I was taught that there is no thing as 'a free lunch' and that paying for something you wanted was the right thing to do. However, I was also a teen and like most young teens I wanted more than my allowance could afford which lead to me and my buddies copying games and music from eachother. Nowadays we have a whole generation that has more or less grown up with the internet in which they can find practically anything that can be reproduced digitally and they've become accustomed to it. In the soccer team I play in on my spare time we have a bunch of guys in the 18-22 year range and it's interesting talking to them about internet and computers. None of them are really interested in computers at all, but basically all of them have one which they for websurfing, games, music, and movies etc. And they all also fileshare on a daily basis.

For the even younger generation which has now grown up with internet and filesharing it seems to have become a way of life, and I personally can't see how legislation can ever hope to break this tide.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Never let go
by Ford Prefect on Mon 16th Feb 2009 17:35 in reply to "RE: Never let go"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

I think you make a good point there. Legislation cannot solve this issue, but on the other hand there really is an issue to be solved.

The only ones who have the possibility in their hands are the producers of the media. Instead of trying to slow this development down with technical (DRM) and legal (lobbying for new laws), they should finally face it.

Which means, offer an alternative.

1. People are not dumb and they realize that if they pay $15 for a CD, the artists never ever get more than $1 from that sale. If I could buy the CD for $5 on the internet in my preferred format, and the artist would get $2.5 from that, it would already be a win-win.

2. If I want to watch a movie tonight I can download it using Google, Torrent software and 3 clicks in about an hour, if popular even in only 30 minutes. I don't have to move my ass one inch for that. There is no competitive commercial (legal) alternative to that as of yet.


They have to *learn* from this instead of just fighting it. I still buy CDs and rent DVDs, but honestly, if you have to put extra work just to pay for it and then fight with limitations.... You could argue it makes more sense to use filesharing and make a donation afterwards...

Edited 2009-02-16 17:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[2]: Never let go
by WorknMan on Mon 16th Feb 2009 18:17 in reply to "RE: Never let go"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

For the even younger generation which has now grown up with internet and filesharing it seems to have become a way of life, and I personally can't see how legislation can ever hope to break this tide.


It's not just the younger generation either, as I know people in their 40's and 50's who fileshare. The fact is that when it comes to piracy, there's NOTHING they can do to stop it. Even if, for example, they started selling music at 10 cents per track (like the Russian mp3 sites do), there are still people who are going to pirate them.

I have heard people say, "Well, if these companies would just do xyz, then piracy wouldn't exist." But I say piracy will ALWAYS exist, no matter what. For one reason or another, people who are filesharing/pirating/stealing/whatever feel justified in doing so. If you take away one of their jusitifications, they will just come up with another. I'm not here to say whether this is right or wrong; I'm just saying that the cat is out of the bag and now there's NO putting it back in.

If it can be seen or heard, it can be copied, and it WILL be copied. And that goes for games and software as well. If that means that the only way an industry can survive is for people to create content in their spare time because people refuse to pay for it, then that's how it's going to have to be. But you're not going to be able to legislate your way out of this problem. It just ain't gonna happen.

Edited 2009-02-16 18:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Never let go
by tyrione on Tue 17th Feb 2009 04:00 in reply to "RE: Never let go"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

Being from Sweden aswell, I have noticed the whole 'filesharing' thing getting alot of media coverage here during the past 10 months or so. Being of the 'older' generation I was taught that there is no thing as 'a free lunch' and that paying for something you wanted was the right thing to do. However, I was also a teen and like most young teens I wanted more than my allowance could afford which lead to me and my buddies copying games and music from eachother. Nowadays we have a whole generation that has more or less grown up with the internet in which they can find practically anything that can be reproduced digitally and they've become accustomed to it. In the soccer team I play in on my spare time we have a bunch of guys in the 18-22 year range and it's interesting talking to them about internet and computers. None of them are really interested in computers at all, but basically all of them have one which they for websurfing, games, music, and movies etc. And they all also fileshare on a daily basis.

For the even younger generation which has now grown up with internet and filesharing it seems to have become a way of life, and I personally can't see how legislation can ever hope to break this tide.


You're not from Generation X if you're copying Computer Games. Gen-X was there when DOS was screwing over PCDOS and more. Gen-X was in highschool where you were dealing with 360KB 5 1/4" floppies on an 8086.

You're more of the Gen QuasiXY, but yes your were around enough to appreciate and hate the term, ``there is no such thing as a free lunch.''

As I approach my 40th birthday I'm glad to have been a kid when Red Line BMX bikes, Schwinn, QuadAngle and other bikes were our main notions of freedom--riding with your buddies for hours in neighborhoods not worrying about being kidnapped, shot at or being arrested for stealing vegetables from the old man in the neighbhood's garden sure seems like Mayberry, compared to today's drones who more and more can't stomach the notion of physical exertion.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Never let go
by bugjacobs on Tue 17th Feb 2009 21:28 in reply to "RE: Never let go"
bugjacobs Member since:
2009-01-03

They WILL break p2p, with Fascism.

Edited 2009-02-17 21:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1