Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 16th Feb 2009 21:57 UTC, submitted by Peter Bui
NetBSD Andrew Doran and Jared D. McNeill have announced in a mailing list post that they are starting a NetBSD Desktop Project with the goal of: "Given a NetBSD CD and a reasonably modern x86 computer, make it possible to install a useful desktop system in under 15 minutes, responding to only a few prompts in the process." Initial plans are being formulated on the project wiki page.
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desktop
by miserj on Mon 16th Feb 2009 22:50 UTC
miserj
Member since:
2006-05-15

I would love OpenBSD to do this too. It would probably require a lot of work if they wanted to keep everything as secure as the core (most likely).

Reply Score: 3

RE: desktop
by KugelKurt on Mon 16th Feb 2009 22:59 in reply to "desktop"
KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

OpenBSD isn't a desktop OS.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: desktop
by darknexus on Mon 16th Feb 2009 23:29 in reply to "RE: desktop"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

OpenBSD isn't a desktop OS.

Neither is FreeBSD or NetBSD, but they can both be made into very nice desktops if you wish. It's foolish to classify one os as "desktop" or "server." OpenBSD, as it stands now, is more suited to servers. Put a DE on top of it, write some configuration utilities, and work on ACPI and guess what? You've got a desktop-oriented os. OpenBSD is not currently oriented to the desktop. That does not mean it's "not a desktop os" inherently.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: desktop
by bradley on Tue 17th Feb 2009 00:12 in reply to "RE: desktop"
bradley Member since:
2007-03-02

Yes... but it can be used for a desktop just like any other OS with a UI.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: desktop
by Doc Pain on Tue 17th Feb 2009 11:48 in reply to "RE: desktop"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

OpenBSD, like all the BSD systems, is a multi-purpose OS. As an example from reality, I'm using FreeBSD exclusively on my desktop since 4.0 without any problems. NetBSD has the same possibilities. Agreeing to this fact, "starting a desktop project" would be a bit misleading, because it's already usable as a desktop. Some kind of preconfiguration and adjustment (like DesktopBSD and PC-BSD did with FreeBSD OS) could of course make things easier. The NetBSD Live 2007 live system CD, for example, already has some stuff to be considered belonging to a desktop system (KDE environment and accessories).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: desktop
by darknexus on Mon 16th Feb 2009 23:37 in reply to "desktop"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

As cool as that would be, I don't see OpenBSD doing it. Say what you might about Theo, but he knows what he wants and sticks to it, and in OpenBSD's case, that's a minimal core with the user tweaking the system how they wish. Naturally there's nothing to stop someone else from doing it, but I don't expect the OpenBSD team themselves to make it a priority.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: desktop
by dragonmantank on Mon 16th Feb 2009 23:51 in reply to "desktop"
dragonmantank Member since:
2009-02-16

You can use OpenBSD as a primary desktop OS. Just tell it you want to use X during the install and then install Gnome, KDE, Flux/Openbox, or almost any window manager from packages or ports. Is it as slick as Ubuntu or Fedora for new users? No, but those aren't the primary users of OpenBSD.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: desktop
by renox on Tue 17th Feb 2009 10:57 in reply to "RE: desktop"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

The thing is, if the OpenBSD project wanted to make a desktop version of their OS, they would most probably want to keep their 'security' focus so they couldn't just slap KDE or Gnome on top because as shown here:
http://lwn.net/Articles/319072/ those desktop have a serious security issue..

Reply Parent Score: 2