Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 24th Feb 2009 18:22 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Chip company ARM is prepping to make its move into the netbook market, and now it has shown off a few prototype designs that really show off the benefits of using the ARM platform: thanks to passive cooling, no fans are required, enabling ARM netbooks to be much thinner and lighter than their Intel counterparts. Thanks to ZDNet, we have a nice video overview of these ARM netbooks - as well as a few very tiny ARM desktop machines.
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RE[2]: I'm almost excited
by lemur2 on Wed 25th Feb 2009 03:58 UTC in reply to "RE: I'm almost excited"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

There is a big market out there (especially embedded devices, servers and supercomputers) these days for anything that can run Linux.


Speaking of which ... here is a server machine, that is also an embedded device, that runs Debian:

http://www.tgdaily.com/html_tmp/content-view-41525-136.html


It is built right in to the wall plug!

I have no idea what architecture it actually is, but I don't think it is x86.

Anyway ... once you have the basic build environment set up, and you can successfully cross-compile the kernel, then given that Debian is all about having the source code available, it means that all 26,000+ Debian packages should be available to your port almost straight away (once the initial work is done).

That type of thing is the whole POINT of having the source code. One can port it.

Incidentally ... Debian's collection of 26,000+ packages is perhaps the biggest SINGLE collection (as in, all in the one place) of source code on the planet, wouldn't it be?

Edited 2009-02-25 04:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I'm almost excited
by transputer_guy on Wed 25th Feb 2009 05:17 in reply to "RE[2]: I'm almost excited"
transputer_guy Member since:
2005-07-08

<
http://www.tgdaily.com/html_tmp/content-view-41525-136.html

It is built right in to the wall plug!
>

Or just go to Marvell.com

That link is almost as interesting but for a variety of other uses, embedded controllers and what not. The ARM netbox version shown in the article though is a bigger more capable device. If $200 buys a netbook, I wonder what a netbook without the KB & LCD will cost. Thats something I could slap on the back of any monitor. The Marvell link gives a $50-$100 netbox inside the power brick but probably less capable in some way. It is an ARM chip architecture combined with many other PC components on a single SOC (system on a chip). It even says 512MB of DRAM inside, but I bet that is off chip but packaged as bare dice on femto sized board. It has no video, just 1 Gb network and 1 USB2 port, period.

Question
Does Ubuntu/Linux support any of the USB->VGA adapters out there? And if it does, would that only be for a second head rather than the only head?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I'm almost excited
by lemur2 on Wed 25th Feb 2009 05:28 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm almost excited"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Or just go to Marvell.com That link is almost as interesting but for a variety of other uses, embedded controllers and what not. The ARM netbox version shown in the article though is a bigger more capable device. If $200 buys a netbook, I wonder what a netbook without the KB & LCD will cost. Thats something I could slap on the back of any monitor. The Marvell link gives a $50-$100 netbox inside the power brick but probably less capable in some way. It is an ARM chip architecture combined with many other PC components on a single SOC (system on a chip). It even says 512MB of DRAM inside, but I bet that is off chip but packaged as bare dice on femto sized board. It has no video, just 1 Gb network and 1 USB2 port, period. Question Does Ubuntu/Linux support any of the USB->VGA adapters out there? And if it does, would that only be for a second head rather than the only head?


Wouldn't it be better to just run VNC on the server brick?

VNC implements a "virtual X" service on the embedded device, such that it actually uses the remote client Xorg server to provide the screen, render the graphics and provide the keyboard and mouse. This is all done via the gigabit ethernet interface, rather than the much slower USB interface.

http://www.tightvnc.com/

"TightVNC is a free remote control software package derived from the popular VNC software. With TightVNC, you can see the desktop of a remote machine and control it with your local mouse and keyboard, just like you would do it sitting in the front of that computer."

... Of course, being Linux, you could always just use the command line via ssh ... boring, I know, but it does work.

Edited 2009-02-25 05:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I'm almost excited
by steve_s on Wed 25th Feb 2009 20:14 in reply to "RE[2]: I'm almost excited"
steve_s Member since:
2006-01-16

A bit of research and you'll find that wall-plug computer is based on Marvell's Sheeva platform, which is ARM compatible.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: I'm almost excited
by lemur2 on Thu 26th Feb 2009 00:22 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm almost excited"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

A bit of research and you'll find that wall-plug computer is based on Marvell's Sheeva platform, which is ARM compatible.


I found plenty of references to the Sheeva platform, but none of them mentioned it being ARM compatible. I had thought it might be ARM based rather than x86 ... but nothing in my quick look actually said so.

Reply Parent Score: 2