Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Feb 2009 21:01 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Windows Based on all the user feedback ignited by the Windows 7 beta, Microsoft has made a set of tweaks to the release candidate of Windows 7. The Engineering 7 weblog details 36 of those tweaks, in quite some detail actually. Let's take a look at some interesting ones.
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Customer in control?
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 26th Feb 2009 23:21 UTC
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

"7. Newly installed programs

“Customer in control” is so strong a mantra for Windows 7 we don’t even allow programs to pin themselves to the taskbar when they are installed. This is a task expressly reserved for the customer."


Sounds like a good idea, actually. Now, if only they'd extend that to the system tray, instead of just hiding all the programs running down there, zapping system resources, actually prevent them from starting up at boot until the user verifies that it's ok. Otherwise, just take it as, "sorry, you're not allowed to run unless explicitly started by the user."

Reply Score: 2

RE: Customer in control?
by darknexus on Fri 27th Feb 2009 01:29 in reply to "Customer in control?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

How about they extend that to all startup programs, be it in the registry, or services, or startup group. No program may automatically run after it is installed unless the user allows it, period.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Customer in control?
by UltraZelda64 on Fri 27th Feb 2009 18:34 in reply to "RE: Customer in control?"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

How about they extend that to all startup programs, be it in the registry, or services, or startup group. No program may automatically run after it is installed unless the user allows it, period.

Well, that's kind of what I mean. So many programs have themselves (or some worthless part of themselves) set to start up in the taskbar, which tends to be at startup most of the time.

It's bad enough that Windows software "installers" are executables in their own right, requiring full admin privileges which grants them full power on the system, and the only way to make sure they won't do what you don't want is to not run it. Meanwhile, Windows has no internal capability to block these attempts at unwanted and/or unnecessary taskbar and startup processes.

It's be a good way to block malware and viruses from starting at boot as well, and it's not like Microsoft can't whitelist software from security or other "trusted" companies. Not that I trust security companies to begin with, anyway.

Edited 2009-02-27 18:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2