Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Mar 2009 17:31 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Internet Explorer Details are scarce at the moment, but testers familiar with the recently leaked Windows 7 build 7048 confirm that Internet Explorer 8 is now an optional component in Windows 7. This is most likely a direct consequence of the EU investigation into the bundling of IE. Still, a few questions remain.
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Windows 98
by KugelKurt on Wed 4th Mar 2009 19:26 UTC
KugelKurt
Member since:
2005-07-06

In Windows 98's installation routine it was so easy to do a custom installation and select additional components or deselect some default apps. If MS just kept it that way, the antitrust case for Windows Media Player would never have happened.
Instead MS chose to treat its users bad by making it unnecessary complicated to remove unwanted components and on top of that even getting itself in a position that's like begging to get sued.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Windows 98
by Hiev on Wed 4th Mar 2009 19:41 in reply to "Windows 98"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

In 1998 nobody really wanted to remove a web browser.

There it was just Netscape and IE, and Netscape, and you could have them both, web standars were practicatly inexisting.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Windows 98
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 4th Mar 2009 22:27 in reply to "RE: Windows 98"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I did. I wanted to remove Netscape 2. You could have multiple instances of Netscape installed on the same system. In the dorm's lab we had Netscape 2,3, & 4 installed on some computers. Then users would fire up 2 and complain when hotmail didn't work in it. I think 3 worked at the time as 4 was pretty new. Sometimes things would look somewhat funky in Netscape or Ie, but most everything worked in either. With the exception of active x, or any other weird MS technology ( webforms I'm loooking at you!) that some crazy companies used on there intranets.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Windows 98
by bornagainenguin on Wed 4th Mar 2009 22:55 in reply to "RE: Windows 98"
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

Hiev misspoke...

In 1998 nobody really wanted to remove a web browser.


Please tell that to all the users of ieradicator, an inf script that allowed users to decouple IE from their Win95C inTell that to Shane Brooks whose built quite a pile of money off doing so with a tiny utility you might have heard of called "98Lite" which allowed for this functionality. You might also want to talk to some of the people in the then hopping shell replacement scene who were very much unhappy with the bloat that is and was having IE installed on their systems.

You may also wish to look into the old "Revenge of Mozilla" which allowed users to rip out IE and use Mozilla instead, although that may have come on the scene later...

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Windows 98
by WereCatf on Wed 4th Mar 2009 19:51 in reply to "Windows 98"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Well, to be honest, I find it absurd to fine (or threatening to fine) Microsoft for including a web browser with their OS. Who does NOT want a browser these days? It's just common sense to include such more-or-less mandatory applications. And of course they will include software they have control over and know the innards of. It'd be silly for them not to.

Microsoft has done a lot of bad stuff, but making up new and new reasons to fine them isn't any better.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Windows 98
by arpan on Wed 4th Mar 2009 19:56 in reply to "RE: Windows 98"
arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

I think that the idea is that if companies that make and sell systems want to install a different browser, they should be allowed to replace IE with Firefox, Opera, Chrome etc.

This would allow for example, Google to pay HP or Dell to replace IE with Chrome.

I dearly hope that this happens eventually, as that is the only way that IE is going to lose its majority market share in the near future.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE: Windows 98
by DrillSgt on Wed 4th Mar 2009 22:32 in reply to "Windows 98"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

In Windows 98's installation routine it was so easy to do a custom installation and select additional components or deselect some default apps. If MS just kept it that way, the antitrust case for Windows Media Player would never have happened.
Instead MS chose to treat its users bad by making it unnecessary complicated to remove unwanted components and on top of that even getting itself in a position that's like begging to get sued.


MS chose to treat it's users bad, by installing what people asked for? Back then, people were screaming that there was no media player installed by default. MS was being bitched at for not having one. So to answer that, they began installing Windows media Player..because it is what the customers were screaming for. No one wanted it removed, so they installed it without the removal option. Now the technical crowd screams for it to be removable, yet customers want it. That is easily proven by the flop that is Windows N.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Windows 98
by bornagainenguin on Wed 4th Mar 2009 23:02 in reply to "RE: Windows 98"
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

DrillSgt astroturfed...

MS chose to treat it's users bad, by installing what people asked for? Back then, people were screaming that there was no media player installed by default. MS was being bitched at for not having one. So to answer that, they began installing Windows media Player..because it is what the customers were screaming for.


Really? I don't recall this at all. I do recall wishing Microsoft would work with some of the other players to allow codecs interoperatability...

I think at that time I was either using the Sasmiki2000, as it allowed me to play pretty much everything in one player. These days I get by much happier with Media Player Classic in Windows abnd use Gnome-mplayer in Linux.

DrillSgt astrotuurfed...
No one wanted it removed, so they installed it without the removal option. Now the technical crowd screams for it to be removable, yet customers want it. That is easily proven by the flop that is Windows N.


Heh...funny. Mind telling me where that was for sale to home users? Well they must have offered it to their technical crowd enthusiasts, right? No...? Funny how it was a flop when it was unavailable for purchase...

--bornagainpenguin

Edited 2009-03-04 23:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3