Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Mar 2009 13:27 UTC
Windows For Windows 7, Microsoft has made some changes to User Account Control to counter the criticism that UAC was too intrusive. It didn't take long before several holes were poked in Windows 7's default UAC settings, and now one is left to wonder: is it wise to sacrifice security for (perceived?) usability? Ars has an editorial that deals with this question.
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This cannot be solved easily.
by Tuishimi on Thu 5th Mar 2009 15:16 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

The problem with NT+ is that "John Doe" users cannot be bothered to learn how to secure their system. It's something a system manager would have done FOR them on a mainframe, and make no mistake, many of the file system concepts behind NTFS is a mainframe operating system (linux/bsd users take time to learn the basics about their file systems and OS X users are shielded from much of that, but the protections are still in place).

All the stuff you need to lock down NT+ is available, you just need to use it.

Exasperating the problem is 3rd party software, much of which requires relaxed rules to install and run properly.

Microsoft has gotten themselves into a pretty bad situation by allowing all of this to come to fruition and I really don't see what they can do now.

Reply Score: 7

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

"
Microsoft has gotten themselves into a pretty bad situation by allowing all of this to come to fruition and I really don't see what they can do now.
"

They can setup network repositories through Windows Update. Software available would then be vetted and approved as compatible. Of course, this won't happen since it would mean including software which competes directly against Microsoft's own products. The company, if not the shareholders, will never allow such a thing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

:D

Like I said...

They've dug themselves in deep. They've allowed a culture of (and this is a bad term I know, sorry) dumb users to blossom who expect all their old software to work forever (really another problem I guess) and who don't know HOW an operating system works, or what it even is, and now it is biting them in the behind.

Well, it isn't REALLY biting them in the behind because they still hold the vast majority of the market.

Reply Parent Score: 3