Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Mar 2009 13:27 UTC
Windows For Windows 7, Microsoft has made some changes to User Account Control to counter the criticism that UAC was too intrusive. It didn't take long before several holes were poked in Windows 7's default UAC settings, and now one is left to wonder: is it wise to sacrifice security for (perceived?) usability? Ars has an editorial that deals with this question.
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User attitudes
by Delgarde on Thu 5th Mar 2009 20:14 UTC
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

Don't forget that home users don't actually care about a lot of this kind of thing. For a single-user machine, the concept of different logins and levels of privilege is kind of obscure - the user just wants to use the machine. How do you explain that to install a program, they need to be some kind of administrator user? They don't want to be some other user, they just want to install a program.

Reply Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

users don't want to know about oil changes or wear restrictive seat belts.. and god forbit they should share the road with other drivers.. yet, one has to have a license which demonstraits a level of competency when piloting a vehicle.

One needs to take five minutes to understand the user of a hammer, screw driver, type of screwdriver or more automated power tools. If it's imobile shop tools, things become even more complicated.

Heck, the first time one sees a toaster, they have to take the time to realize that bread goes in the slots then you lever is pushed down (or whatever the mechanism).

Why is it just assumed that computers will work from most basic to most advanced features with no training, or interest in training?

(just a general comment.. it's a double-standard that comes up from time to time)

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

users don't want to know about oil changes or wear restrictive seat belts.. and god forbit they should share the road with other drivers.. yet, one has to have a license which demonstraits a level of competency when piloting a vehicle.

One needs to take five minutes to understand the user of a hammer, screw driver, type of screwdriver or more automated power tools. If it's imobile shop tools, things become even more complicated.

Heck, the first time one sees a toaster, they have to take the time to realize that bread goes in the slots then you lever is pushed down (or whatever the mechanism).

Why is it just assumed that computers will work from most basic to most advanced features with no training, or interest in training?

(just a general comment.. it's a double-standard that comes up from time to time)


Because end users see computers as big magical and wonderful machines that whirl, hum with lots of flashing lights and bright pictures on the screen. They randomly click on shit in a vein hope of something loading and then do what they have to do. To the end user they, for some reason, view a computer as some sort of magical device that does a whole heap of things for them - ignoring the fact that a computer is nothing more than a tool to get a job done.

Does it show end users are dumb? no. What it demonstrates is that marketing is working because 30 years ago people didn't have that perception. Computers were seen as giant number crunchers - you put stuff in and got stuff back. Now, thanks to the wonders of marketing, we have end users who think that a computer is more than that.

Edited 2009-03-07 02:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2