Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Mar 2009 23:02 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption With the infamous PWN2OWN contest drawing ever closer, the heat is ramping up. This year's instalment pitches Apple's Safari (on the Mac), Google's Chrome, Internet Explorer 8, and Firefox (all on Windows 7) against one another, while also allowing crackers to take on mobile platforms. Last year's winner, Charlie Miller, who won by cracking Mac OS X within minutes last year, says Safari on the Mac will be the first to fall.
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RE[2]: Why?
by protagonist on Fri 6th Mar 2009 20:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Why?"
protagonist
Member since:
2005-07-06

"It desmonstrate a dirty secret that Mac OS X has already been compromised and that user are not/less aware of it because *everybody* knows that there is no virus on macs (if you think you did find one, it might be a "feature", sorry for this)."

I get sick and tired of seeing people spew out this stuff. I have been using and working on computers for almost 40 years now and I have used OS X for the last 5 years now. I also know a number of other OS X users and most of them do not "know" that there are no virus files for Macs. In fact it has been my experience that a higher percentage of Windows usres "know" they do not need AV and firewall protection. So let's cut the crap and get down to business.

Safari probably will fall first, but not for the reasons Miller gives. The nature of the contest insures that the most attention will be focused where the glory is. And has been mentioned already there is nlittle glory in hacking an OS that has been hacked so many times that one more instance is not particulary news.

There is no such thing as a 100% secure OS and probably never will be. The real problem is not with Windows, or OS X or Linux or any mainstream OS for that matter. As a technology writer once wrote years back, "I could send out an email with an attachemnt called thisisavirus.exe" and some people would open it.

Real security lies between the brain and the keyboard. Unfortunately most computer users turn the brain off when they sit down in front of their computer.

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