Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Mar 2009 11:48 UTC, submitted by PLan
In the News In a move that would certainly shake up the computer industry quite a bit, IBM is reportedly in talks with Sun Microsystems about the possibility of IBM acquiring Sun. Sun is going through hard times at the moment, and has been actively looking for someone to be acquired by.
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RE: Will OpenSolaris survive?
by spiderman on Wed 18th Mar 2009 12:47 UTC in reply to "Will OpenSolaris survive?"
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

I don't think they will kill it either. If they wanted to kill something they would kill AIX and replace it with Solaris. What would they win by buying something to kill it? Solaris is one of the best products out there. If they buy it and not leverage it in their offering, they are plain idiots who burn money for the sake of it. I don't think IBM executives are idiots, they probably know full well the value of Solaris. If they buy Sun, IBM will take the number one spot again and their offering won't be matched by any other corporation in the world, and they get that for very cheap since Sun is currently massively undervalued by the market.

In my opinion, that would be a Good Thing for IBM, a Good Thing for Sun and a Good Thing for the world.

Edited 2009-03-18 12:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: Will OpenSolaris survive?
by mpxlbs on Wed 18th Mar 2009 12:56 in reply to "RE: Will OpenSolaris survive?"
mpxlbs Member since:
2009-01-25

Didn't Palm aquire BE and "killed" it?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Palm and Be, Inc.
by s_groening on Wed 18th Mar 2009 13:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Will OpenSolaris survive?"
s_groening Member since:
2005-12-13

Maybe BeOS but not BeIA, the internet appliances platform that Be had been developing.

If it wasn't for that, Be would have nothing to offer Palm at the time, I'm sure.

Reply Parent Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't think they will kill it either. If they wanted to kill something they would kill AIX and replace it with Solaris.

That's wishful thinking really. AIX is only around for historical reasons at IBM, and all of the new stuff is simply being put into Linux. There is really no sense at all in keeping Solaris going. It's very expensive to keep your own whole OS going these days without cost sharing, even for IBM and Sun.

IBM will do what Sun should have done years ago if this actually materialises - start progressively ditching Solaris, and AIX fully, and share the costs by using Linux. It's also what Novell should have done with Netware, but haven't, and they will go the same way.

What would they win by buying something to kill it? Solaris is one of the best products out there.

Wishful thinking. IBM is not interested in acquiring technology that, quite frankly, isn't that brilliant and that people have been gradually moving from for the past ten years. They're only interested in acquiring a customer base for a knock-down price.

I don't think IBM executives are idiots, they probably know full well the value of Solaris.

There is no value to Solaris and hasn't been for some time, other than cannibalising some code that might prove useful elsewhere. ZFS is the only thing that springs to mind really.

In my opinion, that would be a Good Thing for IBM, a Good Thing for Sun and a Good Thing for the world.

The reason why this is being talked about is because Sun have been stupid for the past ten years, won't change their ways and without a takeover they will go bankrupt in the not-too-distant future because their cost-base is too high and they can't fire any more people. I wouldn't paint this as a good thing for Sun at all. It's abject failure.

Reply Parent Score: 2

dvzt Member since:
2008-10-23

IBM will do what Sun should have done years ago if this actually materialises - start progressively ditching Solaris, and AIX fully, and share the costs by using Linux.


They didn't do it, and won't be able to for some time - Linux just can't scale on larger (say 64 cores and more) server.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kryogenix Member since:
2008-01-06

IBM will do what Sun should have done years ago if this actually materialises - start progressively ditching Solaris, and AIX fully, and share the costs by using Linux. It's also what Novell should have done with Netware, but haven't, and they will go the same way.


Hate to break it to you but Linux is still not as scalable as Solaris or AIX.

It's also not quite as rock-solid in a fileserver/domain controller role as Netware was. It was very hard to kill Netware 3.12 or Netware 4.

All of these operating systems also have something Linux doesn't. A stable API/ABI that doesn't change every kernel revision. Of course most Linux fanbois call that a feature.

I love open source OS's and software, don't get me wrong, but my love is for the one true original open source UNIX. BSD.

GNU/Linux is NOT a magic bullet to the world's problems and is chock full of plenty of flaws just like any other platform.

Wishful thinking. IBM is not interested in acquiring technology that, quite frankly, isn't that brilliant and that people have been gradually moving from for the past ten years. They're only interested in acquiring a customer base for a knock-down price.


Sun has plenty of brilliant technologies, some of them are even in Solaris. DTrace, zones, ZFS, etc.

Just because a bunch of people can clone the functionality and offer it for free does NOT make the free product better. Just because you can poach that product's users with your free buggy implementation doesn't make your product better. Show me some REAL functionality that has appeared out of a vacuum in Linux? If you say GNOME I'll slap you.

Where's the killer features GNU/Linux has that no other free UNIX or commercial UNIX has?

It's unfortunate that SPARC hasn't caught on seeing as how it's an open platform where you wouldn't have to license the damn instruction set to make your own version.

Just because Sun can't dump $4,000,000,000,000 into polishing a slow horrible turd of a CPU architecture until it hits the 5GHz mark doesn't mean that anything non-x86 is crap.

Just because Linux is free doesn't necessarily make it "better" than real SysV or BSD.

While Linux has a cool development model that ensures fairly rapid innovation, it falls over in many situations because of it. Nothing ever has time to fully mature before it's replaced with a new and fairly buggy re-implementation. Nothing is truly polished. It feels like a giant beta release all the time. BSD isn't quite as bad.

Reply Parent Score: 6

gehersh Member since:
2006-01-03

Why to buy something to kill it? Very simple. To get their customer's base.

From my experience (and I *did* work for IBM), it will work probably like this. First, they would put all the development/enhancements of product X on hold. Next they offshore the support, so you would have to have rather painfull conversation with some cow from Bangalore when the feature XYZ does not work. Next they would offer you to replace already obsolete product X with their latest and the greatest product whatever.

Reply Parent Score: 1

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Yep, that's the way it works at IBM. Its crap, sad and awful, but that's what they do. Everything in a certain area is put on hold and they then start selling everyone something else until the stuff on hold gets completely replaced. Sun have made a big rod for their own backs here by not pulling their fingers out.

Reply Parent Score: 0