Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 25th Mar 2009 18:57 UTC, submitted by Michael
KDE On Friday, KDE officially launched its version of Dell's IdeaStorm - KDE Brainstorm. In less than 24 hours, over 100 new ideas were proposed. "Getting the non-developer and developer communities really communicating is often a challenge, and KDE's approach is a great start. Developers now have an opportunity to hear what end-users want."
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RE: ...
by Michael on Wed 25th Mar 2009 23:35 UTC in reply to "..."
Michael
Member since:
2005-07-01

I think it all goes back to 4.0 being a testing release. It didn't make sense during the early, bug-fixing period of KDE4 to start thinking already about new features. The fact that they're now asking for feature requests suggests that the desktop environment is now "ready".

The website provides a forum where users and devs can get together to debate new features. This strikes me as being a more productive way of approaching the problem than the scattering of mailing list posts and bug reports.

I think you should give it a chance to fail rather than declaring it DOA.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by lemur2 on Wed 25th Mar 2009 23:48 in reply to "RE: ..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I think it all goes back to 4.0 being a testing release. It didn't make sense during the early, bug-fixing period of KDE4 to start thinking already about new features. The fact that they're now asking for feature requests suggests that the desktop environment is now "ready". The website provides a forum where users and devs can get together to debate new features. This strikes me as being a more productive way of approaching the problem than the scattering of mailing list posts and bug reports. I think you should give it a chance to fail rather than declaring it DOA.


This is more or less reasonable. The only other point to make is that, in an entirely similar fashion to KDE 4.0, both KDE 3.0 and GNOME 2.0 were "not ready".

Well, now, at KDE 4.2.1, KDE4 has caught and passed KDE3 and GNOME. So lets forget the debate that tries to say that KDE 4.0 should not have been released to users (despite the fact that KDE 3.0 and GNOME 2.0 were both released to users) and just get on with the innovation and excitement that is KDE4.

Reply Parent Score: 5