Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Mar 2009 17:12 UTC, submitted by inkslinger
Windows "Even though Microsoft has, in the past, made marketing capital from synchronising its releases, group product manager Ward Ralston says that the desktop and server groups are two separate units that do not need to be released simultaneously. Windows 7 will should make its official appearance this year, but that major shift in the desktop experience isn't going to be matched with a similar sea-change on the server Operating System front. Microsoft has settled for only a minor upgrade to Windows Server 2008."
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RE[4]: Completely unimportant
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 26th Mar 2009 23:49 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Completely unimportant"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

. AFAIK, the only possibility to run a common set of servers that will serve all three client types equally well is to run Linux servers.


Are you implying that Linux clients can't connect to Windows machines? Or Mac clients? Shit, you should've told my home network of Linux/Windows/Macs.

Got an extra doze of teh crazy today, lemur2?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Completely unimportant
by lemur2 on Fri 27th Mar 2009 02:20 in reply to "RE[4]: Completely unimportant"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

". AFAIK, the only possibility to run a common set of servers that will serve all three client types equally well is to run Linux servers.
Are you implying that Linux clients can't connect to Windows machines? Or Mac clients? Shit, you should've told my home network of Linux/Windows/Macs. Got an extra doze of teh crazy today, lemur2? "

No, I'm claiming that Windows servers go out of their way to support Windows clients only, to the extent that the networking, messaging and authentication protocols were deliberately kept a trade secret for many years, until the EU eventually forced Microsoft to publish the specifications for same.

In other words, if Mac and Linux clients can connect to some services on Windows servers, it is not through Microsoft's interoperability efforts that that has come about. In fact, the opposite is true.

Do you deny this is so?

Edited 2009-03-27 02:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Completely unimportant
by t3RRa on Fri 27th Mar 2009 09:49 in reply to "RE[5]: Completely unimportant"
t3RRa Member since:
2005-11-22

Are you not the only one trying to say something useless thing? I mean its completely off-topic what you are trying to argue. I was reading through comments and at the first of your posts, I was like 'Huh???!' This article is not about interoperability with different platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 1

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I've been using samba and ssh and ldap and what have you for several years before the EU commandment, and I never found it hard to make linux or OS X talk to Windows or vice versa.

You can also install services for Unix if you need to access NFS from Windows. It's not been a problem for 10 years.

like always, the EU was trying to solve problems that OSS had already mostly solved.

Reply Parent Score: 3