Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th Mar 2009 01:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Just now, both the server and desktop editions of the Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope beta have been released. It comes with a boatload of new features, some of which come courtesy of upstream. A new GNOME release, a new X.org release, a new notification system, they're all in there.
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RE: Audio This Time?
by pooo on Fri 27th Mar 2009 16:57 UTC in reply to "Audio This Time?"
pooo
Member since:
2006-04-22

I'm still having problems using Jaunty. Every time I switch on my bluetooth headphones pulse crashes and cannot be restarted properly without logging out and back in. I agree this is getting very old.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Audio This Time?
by darknexus on Fri 27th Mar 2009 17:11 in reply to "RE: Audio This Time?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I agree the Pulseaudio problems are getting very old. Pulse has a lot of potential, but imho it just is not ready for prime time yet and probably won't be for a while. They need to buckle down and make stability a top priority; I don't care if I can send an audio stream to a different computer or device if it's an iffy proposition whether the audio will even play correctly in the first place. I'd rather have the thing play properly than all this ridiculous amount of networking functionality set on top of a less-than-solid core. The networking functionality is cool and everything, presenting some interesting possibilities for home entertainment systems, and the per-application volume feature is also nice and is one of the few features that actually works well. But I'd rather they ditch all that for stability, then put all these features back into play.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Audio This Time?
by sbergman27 on Fri 27th Mar 2009 17:11 in reply to "RE: Audio This Time?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

I'm still having problems using Jaunty. Every time I switch on my bluetooth headphones pulse crashes and cannot be restarted properly without logging out and back in. I agree this is getting very old.

Try:

$ sudo apt-get remove pulseaudio

It aleviates all the audio problems that I have seen, eliminates all the perceptible latency, has resulted in *zero* reduction in functionality that I can detect, and has saved a little memory as an added bonus. I highly recommend it. For whatever reason, adopting Fedora technologies always seems to be bad news for little gain.

Why did we "need" pulseaudio, again? None of the reasons I heard ever made any sense.

Edited 2009-03-27 17:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Audio This Time?
by darknexus on Fri 27th Mar 2009 18:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Audio This Time?"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Try:
$ sudo apt-get remove pulseaudio
It aleviates all the audio problems that I have seen, eliminates all the perceptible latency, has resulted in *zero* reduction in functionality that I can detect, and has saved a little memory as an added bonus. I highly recommend it. For whatever reason, adopting Fedora technologies always seems to be bad news for little gain.

Why did we "need" pulseaudio, again? None of the reasons I heard ever made any sense.

Unless, of course, your sound card either does not do hardware samplerate conversions, or does it poorly. Quite a number of onboard audio chips have this issue, and without an audio server such as pulse, this introduces various artifacts and pops into the audio depending on what your card's hardware parameters are versus what the currently playing sound is. ALSA's facilities for dealing with this problem are minimal, and that's being generous.
Pulse's purpose is to be the layer between the driver and the application, handling all conversions and mixing in software as well as providing application-specific audio streams. I really believe it has enormous potential and eventually we'll wonder what we did without it. Remember, ALSA was crap once too--still is, at least as far as the API goes, but at least it's stable. Pulse's major problem is that it's just not ready to be used by default in mainstream oses--it has latency issues, can be unstable, and some applications just out right don't work properly with it due to its ALSA plugin and OSS wrapper being incomplete. They should have given it another year, at least, before forcing it into the mainstream distros, or at the very least made it an optional configuration choice. It's a nice concept, it's just not ready, they should have let the Fedora users deal with it for a while longer ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 5