Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Apr 2009 13:48 UTC
Bugs & Viruses We're well and deep into April 1 now, and if you were to believe some of the reports and hype on the internet, we should've all been paying in bottle caps right about now. As any sane person already saw coming, the Windows worm Conficker didn't do anything. It just kind of sat there, patiently mocking all those who did not update their machines properly.
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No big suprise there
by Laurence on Wed 1st Apr 2009 14:13 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

A BBC article summed it up nicely:

Vincent Weafer, vice president of security response at anti-virus firm Symantec added: "We believe the software is geared towards making money. The characteristic of this type of worm is to keep it slow and low, keep it under the radar to slowly maximise profits over the long term."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7976099.stm

Edited 2009-04-01 14:14 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: No big suprise there
by bousozoku on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 04:12 in reply to "No big suprise there"
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

A BBC article summed it up nicely:
"Vincent Weafer, vice president of security response at anti-virus firm Symantec added: "We believe the software is geared towards making money. The characteristic of this type of worm is to keep it slow and low, keep it under the radar to slowly maximise profits over the long term."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7976099.stm
"

Couldn't we just apply his response to Symantec's own software? It seems more like exploits than upstanding utilities most of the time. I don't know of any other software that could be labeled as crashware so readily.

Reply Parent Score: 2