Linked by Adam S on Wed 1st Apr 2009 14:29 UTC
Web 2.0 We here at OSNews take open source software seriously. That's why, today, we're making our site's source code available to the public. While some sites have inline SQL statements, embedded passwords, afterthought modules, and sensitive data embedded into their pages, at OSNews, we have a strict system that employs no hacks whatsoever to extend functionality. This is why our site rarely changes look-and-feel and rolls out new features slowly, only after they've been rigorously tested. This code is offered under the BSD license: feel free to use it as you wish! So, today, we're proud to offer you the code that powers OSNews.com. Be sure to start with the README file to get started! Enjoy responsibly.
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A joke?
by kajaman on Wed 1st Apr 2009 20:46 UTC
kajaman
Member since:
2006-01-06

Well, that wouldn't be supprising when lots of services use open source engines, and there's nothing really that interesting in osnews from technical side to keep it secret etc. Just do it guys!

Reply Score: 1

RE: A joke?
by FlipmodePlaya on Wed 1st Apr 2009 22:22 in reply to "A joke?"
FlipmodePlaya Member since:
2005-11-24

I totally agree. I hope I haven't my sense of humor, but I don't think this is funny at all. Is the idea of opening the code to a website so ridiculous - especially one that is very supportive of open source software? Besides, Slashdot does it... http://www.slashcode.com/

OSNews is a great site - share your work with the world!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: A joke?
by sbergman27 on Wed 1st Apr 2009 22:30 in reply to "RE: A joke?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

OSNews is a great site

Which is why it's so insanely popular! Featured on "The Price is Right"! And all that sort of rot!

Or not. Hey, I like hole-in-the-wall sites.

Edited 2009-04-01 22:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: A joke?
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 20:18 in reply to "RE: A joke?"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

My interpretation was that the joke is at the expense of some of the more rabid/fundamentalist free software/OSS supporters - the people who consider software licenses to be more important than basic practical considerations (like whether not the software works worth a damn / does what it's intended to do).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: A joke?
by StephenBeDoper on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 20:09 in reply to "A joke?"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

There have been a few posts on Adam's blog comparing the OSNews CMS to WordPress, pointing out that the OSNews software is fairly well-tuned for heavy load, large amounts of data, etc.

Granted, most of the functionality of OSNews could probably be implemented using most of the popular open source CMS / blogging apps. But, I can certainly see the appeal of having something that's specialized for a particular set of needs.

Having having worked with several of the popular CMS systems out there (WordPress, MovableType, Expression Engine, Drupal etc), it often seems that I end up wasting a lot of time trying to turn off/remove functionality that I don't need.

Edited 2009-04-02 20:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: A joke?
by sbergman27 on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 20:15 in reply to "RE: A joke?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

My interpretation was that the joke is at the expense of some of the more rabid/fundamentalist free software/OSS supporters

As opposed to that majority of FOSS software advocates who believe in Open Source, but retain a realistic perspective. Tend not to be as vocal. But are too often lumped in with the loonies.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: A joke?
by Adam S on Fri 3rd Apr 2009 00:55 in reply to "RE: A joke?"
Adam S Member since:
2005-04-01

I'm glad you've noticed, really. OSNews is written to be high-volume from the ground up. It makes use of incredible amounts of pre-cached data. Cron and pre-generated files play a very large role in constructing the site you see, and future bits will almost certainly make use of JSON and jQuery to hand off some of the work to the client. Anyone who dissects the osn javascript library will immediately see it was not architected with a framework in mind, and as a result, the next generation of improvement will come from condensing our scripting and making better use of the jQuery foundation.

Understanding WordPress internals is my passion of late, but WordPress is definitely a swiss army knife, so to speak. In this case, it would require incredible amounts of work to make WP do what we want to do. The current OSN codebase is incredibly flexible, both extendable and moddable on the fly, so it's very easy for me to add new features and even change the live system. I am very careful about writing code for performance, not beauty (Kroc and I have great debates because my code is based on utility and his on art, and I think we're both better at our jobs because of our spirited discussions). I choose functions and rewrite inefficient portions all the time to measure page load. We used to require multiple servers to withstand the load (many here may remember the janitor or the soup nazi errors), but now we run with little load on 1, due to better SQL, much better code, etc. OSN has withstood a simultaneous digging and slashdotting, so it's highly tuned for load.

I may write a piece one day, if people are interested, on where the differences between conventional CMSes and OSN lie, but we've made several architectural decisions that are for performance: I've very intentionally written procedural code (no objects at all) and rigorously tested our SQL. Sometimes, it's faster to run lots of small queries than to execute one big motherf'er. And again, we offload what we can.

Also, we make changes to things all the time, such as the trust algorithm. We always have changes in the pipeline - for example, right now, we're discussing changes to the mod system, which will mean lots of work to preserve valid and appropriate user history. We treat the site like a community, and hope that's reflected in code.

I've gone on for far too long, but there are quite a bit of major reasons why we'd not be interested in modding something like WordPress or Joomla, and one of them is primary focus on serving high load.

Reply Parent Score: 1