Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 16:12 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Gnome Only a few days ago, we ran an article on the future of KDE and GNOME, and which of the two had the brighter future based on their developmental processes. Barely has that discussion ended, or the GNOME engineering team comes with a pretty daunting plan to introduce a fairly massive reworking of the GNOME interface for GNOME 3.0 (2.30). Read on for the details.
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segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

I will NEVER EVER(!) forget how KDE has screwed up my Powerpoint presentation because it has not managed to connect to the beamer;

Dude, you're a bona fide troll. Fair enough, connecting to a projector (if that's what you actually mean) is difficult at the best of times, certainly with Linux, but to present yourself as knowledgable enough to know that the fault is somehow with KDE is just trolling. Plain and simple. No matter, it's what we've come to expect over the past few months.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Fair enough, connecting to a projector (if that's what you actually mean) is difficult at the best of times, certainly with Linux


I've never, NEVER EVER had Mac OS X or Windows fail when it comes to connecting to a projector, and I've used a lot of those things the past ~9-10 years.

It will always remain a mystery to me why something so mundane as plugging in a 2nd monitor is such a big thing for Linux. It's not like we're asking for world peace.

Reply Parent Score: 4

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

It will always remain a mystery to me why something so mundane as plugging in a 2nd monitor is such a big thing for Linux. It's not like we're asking for world peace.

Plugging in a second monitor is common, but not exactly mundane from a technical standpoint. To some extent, I think we are still safe to blame David Dawes for the lost years of development we suffered. Granted, it's been a while since he was ejected from the scene. But there has been a lot of work to do to recover from it.

Of course, there is also the matter of our bizarre focus upon eye candy, to the exclusion of the more practical matters at hand... like plugging in a second monitor. (Does compiz *really* help our desktops significantly?)

But I do think that things are coming together in a "just works" form. It's just been a long, rocky road, full of detours.

Edited 2009-04-02 22:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

I've never, NEVER EVER had Mac OS X or Windows fail when it comes to connecting to a projector, and I've used a lot of those things the past ~9-10 years.

Well, I must confess that I've never had an issue either with Windows or OS X and projectors. Maybe I've had some trouble getting the correct resolution, but I've always got an image coming out.

Linux, and X specifically, is a bloody nightmare to get a second monitor connected to. There's nothing universal in X so ATI or nVidia go off and create their own ways of doing it. It's certainly not the fault any of the desktops though, and it's only now that we're getting rid of that pile of junk called the xorg.conf file. It's just a pity that there's nowhere to easily put settings when you need them!

Reply Parent Score: 1

DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

I've never, NEVER EVER had Mac OS X or Windows fail when it comes to connecting to a projector, and I've used a lot of those things the past ~9-10 years.


I have! Both OS X and Windows. Of course, all cases were with the same projector.

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

" Fair enough, connecting to a projector (if that's what you actually mean) is difficult at the best of times, certainly with Linux


I've never, NEVER EVER had Mac OS X or Windows fail when it comes to connecting to a projector, and I've used a lot of those things the past ~9-10 years.
"

NEC projectors and IBM laptops using Intel video chipsets don't play well together. Neither do some early HP laptops using Centrino chipsets. We keep three different brands of projectors available at the board office for people doing presentations. These laptops use Windows XP and Vista.

Oddly enough, Kubuntu 7.10 and later on HP laptops don't have any issues with the NEC projector.

It will always remain a mystery to me why something so mundane as plugging in a 2nd monitor is such a big thing for Linux. It's not like we're asking for world peace.


Just like with Windows, it all depends on the driver. I've been using the multi-monitor support (MergedFB) in ATI's fglrx driver on Debian 4.0 and 5.0 without issues (no-name X1300 card). I've recently switched to using xrandr with the OSS ati driver. It's a bit slower, and the few times I've tried desktop effects it's crashed plasma (but I don't use desktop effects even on systems where it doesn't crash), but it works.

Others at work using the ATI driver have no end of issues with Kubuntu. Same with those with nVidia and Ubuntu.

It all depends on driver quality.

Reply Parent Score: 3

thecwin Member since:
2006-01-04

I have on both Windows and OS X with different projectors... the projectors didn't seem to send any information about the resolutions supported and when I 'forced' 800x600, which I knew it supported, it got an out-of-sync error. Admittedly, they were pretty crappy projectors...

Reply Parent Score: 2