Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 16:12 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Gnome Only a few days ago, we ran an article on the future of KDE and GNOME, and which of the two had the brighter future based on their developmental processes. Barely has that discussion ended, or the GNOME engineering team comes with a pretty daunting plan to introduce a fairly massive reworking of the GNOME interface for GNOME 3.0 (2.30). Read on for the details.
E-mail Print r 15   · Read More · 127 Comment(s)
Thread beginning with comment 356518
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

I've never, NEVER EVER had Mac OS X or Windows fail when it comes to connecting to a projector, and I've used a lot of those things the past ~9-10 years.

Well, I must confess that I've never had an issue either with Windows or OS X and projectors. Maybe I've had some trouble getting the correct resolution, but I've always got an image coming out.

Linux, and X specifically, is a bloody nightmare to get a second monitor connected to. There's nothing universal in X so ATI or nVidia go off and create their own ways of doing it. It's certainly not the fault any of the desktops though, and it's only now that we're getting rid of that pile of junk called the xorg.conf file. It's just a pity that there's nowhere to easily put settings when you need them!

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

and it's only now that we're getting rid of that pile of junk called the xorg.conf file. It's just a pity that there's nowhere to easily put settings when you need them!


How about a config file? I would suggest xorg.conf as a name, oh wait...

Seriously, what's bad about xorg.conf? We just need a GUI that touches the file when you need to change something in xorg. Better then, that xorg touches its own config file when it's requested to save changes.

Edited 2009-04-02 22:28 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Seriously, what's bad about xorg.conf?

xorg.conf is not bad per se, because you always want to store some settings permanently, but it is unspeakably bad given the use cases we have today of people plugging different monitors, projectors and even TVs in as well as second displays. What gets set in xorg.conf on install cannot be easily and dynamically changed on-the-fly based on what gets plugged in, and if you have a display that is incompatible with what's in there then you that adds up to black screens.

Reply Parent Score: 3