Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Apr 2009 22:32 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu According to Canonical head honcho Mark Shuttleworth, Windows 7 presents the ideal opportunity for Linux to gain significant inroads into the desktop market. He said so in an interview with InternetNews. While I certainly do hope so, an eerie sense of deja vu creeps up on me: isn't this like the 923298th opportunity where Linux is supposed to make inroads into the desktop market?
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Linux will
by hraq on Fri 3rd Apr 2009 05:13 UTC
hraq
Member since:
2005-07-06

be always useful for some people or companies.
But when it comes to desktop things are different.
Desktop users need applications with high quality, which lacks alot in linux. Linux do have alternatives for everything; if you cannot run photoshop then use gimp, if you cannot run Indesign then use ___ if you cannot run quickbooks use ____ if you cannot run 3dsmax then use linux alternative _____; if and if and if.
Most people and businesses don't like that.
Linux users cannot get the quality of software and software support and features of applications like they can get when they use windows or mac. Of course there are alternative to this too (use wine or vmware) but you know the disadvantages of these to solutions.

Linux hardware drivers and hardware applications are poorly written and shallow. Can I get a software that will program my mouse 8 buttons or that will give me advanced interface for my webcam or will support a TV tuner card with recording feature while I am away(preprogrammed) ..No
Can I get my laptop standby successfully with any linux ..No ( now a guy will ask me to just enter code to allow sound to allow the system to standby) this is not practical for alot of users.

Oh, can I get my intuos tablet to work with pressure brushes or the eraser..No
Windows and macs are popular because they are highly supported by manufacturers of decent products

Linux will never improve unless it will make huge inroads into the high quality applications and drivers (Professional level) untill then its just a development platform or geeky toys in the desktop sector.
Server wise the story is different; Linux rocks.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Linux will
by lemur2 on Fri 3rd Apr 2009 05:27 in reply to "Linux will"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

be always useful for some people or companies. But when it comes to desktop things are different. Desktop users need applications with high quality, which lacks alot in linux. Linux do have alternatives for everything; if you cannot run photoshop then use gimp, if you cannot run Indesign then use ___ if you cannot run quickbooks use ____ if you cannot run 3dsmax then use linux alternative _____; if and if and if. Most people and businesses don't like that. Linux users cannot get the quality of software and software support and features of applications like they can get when they use windows or mac. Of course there are alternative to this too (use wine or vmware) but you know the disadvantages of these to solutions. Linux hardware drivers and hardware applications are poorly written and shallow. Can I get a software that will program my mouse 8 buttons or that will give me advanced interface for my webcam or will support a TV tuner card with recording feature while I am away(preprogrammed) ..No Can I get my laptop standby successfully with any linux ..No ( now a guy will ask me to just enter code to allow sound to allow the system to standby) this is not practical for alot of users. Oh, can I get my intuos tablet to work with pressure brushes or the eraser..No Windows and macs are popular because they are highly supported by manufacturers of decent products Linux will never improve unless it will make huge inroads into the high quality applications and drivers (Professional level) untill then its just a development platform or geeky toys in the desktop sector. Server wise the story is different; Linux rocks.


You are seriously out of date.

Firstly: you would buy a system built with Vista in mind if you wanted Vista, or you would buy a Mac if you wanted OSX. Buy a system that is designed with Linux in mind, and not one of the "issues" that you pretend exist with Linux drivers would arise.

Secondly: try to run Vista on a system that was not designed for it. You will have far, far more problems with drivers and applications that did not work than you would have with Linux.

Finally: you would not need to use alternatives if, for example, Adobe simply released Photoshop for Linux. Adobe has the source code and Linux has compilers galore. If you cannot buy Adobe for Linux then that is an issue you might have with Adobe, not with Linux. (PS: this issue is really overstated anyway ... use something like digikam and krita for photography on Linux, and you will be not far short of Photoshop functionality for zero outlay).

You can get software functionality and features on Linux. As for support ... it is usually better for open source software. Just try to get a closed-source software vendor to support you if your need does not match their agenda ... such as Massechusetts (sp?) government wanting Microsoft to add proper support for OpenDocument as the default file format for MS Office ... fat chance.

Edited 2009-04-03 05:41 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Linux will
by Coxy on Fri 3rd Apr 2009 12:30 in reply to "RE: Linux will"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

Secondly: try to run Vista on a system that was not designed for it. You will have far, far more problems with drivers and applications that did not work than you would have with Linux.


This is dumb argument. Why would any normal person use something on a system it wasn't designed to be run on?

Would you take a Stretched limo off-road over the outback in Australia? Or go snowboarding over water?

Finally: you would not need to use alternatives if, for example, Adobe simply released Photoshop for Linux. Adobe has the source code and Linux has compilers galore. If you cannot buy Adobe for Linux then that is an issue you might have with Adobe, not with Linux.


As someone who uses adobe products everyday, my problem is not with Adobe, but linux. Adobe have the software for the platforms used by most of their software users.

(PS: this issue is really overstated anyway ... use something like digikam and krita for photography on Linux, and you will be not far short of Photoshop functionality for zero outlay).


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Sorry I have my breath back now... you really have no idea about programmes adobe makes if you compare the alternatives with those or the Gimp. There are no adequate aternatives on Linux for Adobe apps - if there were I wouldn't need to use the alternatives because Adobe would then release linux versions.

Reply Parent Score: 3

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

For any platform, more hardware vendor support would be a good thing.

"
Oh, can I get my intuos tablet to work with pressure brushes or the eraser..No
Windows and macs are popular because they are highly supported by manufacturers of decent products
"

With this one though, I'd suggest that "they are highly supported by manufacturers" because "Windows and macs are popular" not the reverse. Microsoft has the momentum already to be the first supported platform when vendors start writing drivers. They've had to employ some questionable business strategy in the past to insure the kind of dominance that can dictate driver support. Apple has a company selected library of hardware so it's just down to supporting addon hardware like printers; being a part of publishing, why they choose to support Apple systems should be obvious. Your scanner also; Windows is the retail leader and Apple is publishing/artwork. If truly interested in why it's not supported on other platforms, you'd have to look at the hardware vendor more closely.

Reply Parent Score: 3