Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Apr 2009 07:26 UTC
Windows Continuing the recently started trend at Microsoft to be a bit more aggressive towards the competition, Brandon LeBlanc wrote on the Windows Experience Weblog about why Windows is such a huge success on netbooks compared to Linux. Also, what is up with that story on AppleInsider about Microsoft offering Windows-7-to-XP downgrade rights? Is that really so special?
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RE: Yawn...
by Knuckles on Tue 7th Apr 2009 09:57 UTC in reply to "Yawn..."
Knuckles
Member since:
2005-06-29

Same here. I want to buy a netbook with linux and I basically can't. Aside from the original aspire one, and the original EEEs (7xx, 9xx) there's nothing else.

I would have bought an EEE PC 1000H right there the first time I found it in a store if there were a linux version. But alas... Searching far and wide it never seemed to turn up, and none of the others carry linux.

So basically it's back to the same: all of them ship with windows, and microsoft gets to claim all those sales, although there are people that the first thing they do is wipe windows and never run it again.

As for "Linux had every chance to become a decent household name here, but for some reason, they blew it", I'd say not really.
The manufacturers blew it with poor distros (instead of a decent, big name distro with a customizations, but still access to all the normal repositories, updates, and a proper desktop), and poor linux support - for most netbooks when released they came with binary drivers for some things (the acpi on eee pcs for one), and took a while to get the sources and the proper patches upstream, where they should have been all along.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Yawn...
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 7th Apr 2009 10:05 in reply to "RE: Yawn..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Well, then, educate the OEMs! Why don't the Linux distribution makers join together to help OEMs with making Linux available? To help them tailor their hardware in such a way that Linux works? Why do OEMs have to deal with ten billion little Linux distributions and their parent companies? Why isn't there a single place for them to go when they want to ship machines with Linux? Why aren't there tools available that make the process easier?

This is not a case of "if you build it, they'll come". If you want to have companies ship Linux, you'll have to actively make them offers, talk to them, help them, educate them.

The major Linux distributors should band together, not to create a single distribution (of course not)m but to create a single source for information for OEMs, as well a single location for them to go to in case they're interested.

Windows isn't successful just because it has a monopoly. Microsoft has built an extensive support network for OEMs to turn to in case they run into trouble. Where's the Linux equivalent? And no, UbuntuForums doesn't count.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Yawn...
by lemur2 on Tue 7th Apr 2009 12:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Yawn..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Windows isn't successful just because it has a monopoly. Microsoft has built an extensive support network for OEMs to turn to in case they run into trouble. Where's the Linux equivalent? And no, UbuntuForums doesn't count.


http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/tag/netbook

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Yawn...
by asgard on Tue 7th Apr 2009 12:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Yawn..."
asgard Member since:
2008-06-07

They are educated. They're just lying. On official ASUS distributor pages for Czechia, there was a poll if you want EEE 901 and 1000 with Linux or Windows. It was 50-50. Still, there was never offered Linux version for 901, only for 900, which has worse hardware, and at higher price. So it's obvious that they're lying.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Yawn...
by sbergman27 on Tue 7th Apr 2009 15:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Yawn..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Why do OEMs have to deal with ten billion little Linux distributions and their parent companies?

Because whenever a distribution is just about there, the community turns on it viciously. We're a big, global, disfunctional family with a penchant for sabotaging our own work.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Yawn...
by Lennie on Tue 7th Apr 2009 17:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Yawn..."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

You mean something like this ?: http://www.linuxdriverproject.org/ where they even create the driver (under NDA if you really, really want it) which will be accepted in the main kernel and maintainced for a cost of 0 other then some documentation ?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Yawn...
by cmost on Wed 8th Apr 2009 01:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Yawn..."
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

Well, then, educate the OEMs! Why don't the Linux distribution makers join together to help OEMs with making Linux available? To help them tailor their hardware in such a way that Linux works? Why do OEMs have to deal with ten billion little Linux distributions and their parent companies? Why isn't there a single place for them to go when they want to ship machines with Linux? Why aren't there tools available that make the process easier?

This is not a case of "if you build it, they'll come". If you want to have companies ship Linux, you'll have to actively make them offers, talk to them, help them, educate them.

The major Linux distributors should band together, not to create a single distribution (of course not)m but to create a single source for information for OEMs, as well a single location for them to go to in case they're interested.

Windows isn't successful just because it has a monopoly. Microsoft has built an extensive support network for OEMs to turn to in case they run into trouble. Where's the Linux equivalent? And no, UbuntuForums doesn't count.


You're assuming people would actually get off their duffs to learn something new. Even if Linux became widely available through OEMs; complete with support networks I doubt many people would drop Windows like a hot brick for Linux machines. People just aren't that interested in "new" or "different", even if it is superior or even equivalent to what they know. You can't get people to care!

Reply Parent Score: 2