Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 12th Apr 2009 20:09 UTC
3D News, GL, DirectX LinuxFund and the Open Graphics Project are teaming up to raise funds and supply 10 Open Graphics Development boards to open source developers. After several years in development the Open Graphics project is offering pre-orders of development boards. The Open Graphics Project aims to design an open source hardware/open architecture and standard for graphics cards, primarily targeting free software/open source operating systems. LinuxFund is accepting donations on their website to help fund the project. Additionally you can pre-order an OGD1 board for yourself through Traversal Technology.
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Good Luck
by abraxas on Mon 13th Apr 2009 13:45 UTC
abraxas
Member since:
2005-07-07

The final product is something I would seriously consider buying if it really does work out to be something that is not only easy to develop open source drivers for but also gets decent graphics performance. It doesn't need to be top of the line, only usable for a 3D desktop and popular 3D applications (other than games). It's not an easy market to get into though and I fear it's going to be a very difficult prospect to sell enough of these to make them price/performance practical compared Nvidia, ATI, and even Intel. Now that laptops are more popular than desktops it's going to be even more difficult.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Good Luck
by supercompman on Mon 13th Apr 2009 16:15 in reply to "Good Luck"
supercompman Member since:
2008-09-14

While I'm excited to see this project progress, I wouldn't get my hopes too high about performance... According to this page (http://wiki.opengraphics.org/tiki-index.php?page=OGPN17) they are expecting this card to perform a bit above a Radeon 7000 or a GeForce 2, which was state of the art nearly ten years ago. I'll probably get one of these in the future if they can produce them cheap enough (<= $40), but I don't expect something that will perform on the same level as even the cheapest video cards you can purchase... Right now from taking a quick look at Newegg, it looks like you can pick up a low end GeForce 8 series card for $30 with an additional $10 MIR, but I'm willing to pay a bit of a premium for something that is fully open and I _know_ will be supported for years to come, however I don't think most consumers look at it quite like that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good Luck
by theosib on Mon 13th Apr 2009 17:10 in reply to "RE: Good Luck"
theosib Member since:
2006-03-02

Just to clarify, the FPGA is expected to perform at that speed. An ASIC could be clocked very fast.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good Luck
by Brendan on Tue 14th Apr 2009 00:41 in reply to "RE: Good Luck"
Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

While I'm excited to see this project progress, I wouldn't get my hopes too high about performance... According to this page (http://wiki.opengraphics.org/tiki-index.php?page=OGPN17) they are expecting this card to perform a bit above a Radeon 7000 or a GeForce 2, which was state of the art nearly ten years ago. I'll probably get one of these in the future if they can produce them cheap enough (


A "top of the line" Nvidia card with no device driver (e.g. using VBE and doing everything in software) would probably be a lot slower than one of these with full support for hardware acceleration. I think you're under-estimating the value of open documentation, especially for every OS that isn't Windows.

-Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 2