Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Apr 2009 19:54 UTC
General Unix Even though the old-world UNIX operating systems, like IRIX and HP-UX, have been steadily losing ground to Linux for a long time now, they do still get updated and improved. HP-UX 11i v3 is supposed to get update 4 tomorrow, with a host of new features that won't excite you if you're used to Linux, but they're still pretty useful for HP-UX users.
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RE: THIS NEWS ISN'T ABOUT LINUX
by kragil on Thu 16th Apr 2009 21:01 UTC in reply to "THIS NEWS ISN'T ABOUT LINUX"
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04
dvzt Member since:
2008-10-23



Yes, Linux is frequently used on supercomputers, because it's free and there is source code available so it can be modified to work with custom machines. What's your point?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Yes, Linux is frequently used on supercomputers, because it's free and there is source code available so it can be modified to work with custom machines. What's your point?


His point was in reply to the person questioning whether Linux scaled to the kind of hardware HP-UX runs on. The answer being a very definite *yes*.

Reply Parent Score: 2

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Yes, Linux is frequently used on supercomputers, because it's free


Right, and do you think that matters if you are purchasing a tens of million Euros (dollars) supercomputer?

There are two reasons Linux is used on supercomputers:

- It has become the standard UNIX(-ish) platform that runs on scientist workstations up to supercomputers. Meaning that you can do stuff at every level with the same familiar environment (both API and userland).
- It's scalable enough for supercomputer applications.

Eventually Linux will kill off all other UNIXen (except for Darwin/OS X). Even the remaining UNIX server vendors (IBM and HP) invest quite heavily in Linux, if they can keep their hardware customers and ice their UNIX offerings, there is a much better profit margin for them. Oh, and it is what customers request ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 1

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19



The link on it's own isn't much of a demonstration of scalability, since while Linux makes up a huge proportion of those systems, it doesn't distinguish between massively parallel machines versus clusters of cheap hardware.

That said, they're there. Number #3 on the list is an SGI Altix box, apparently running SUSE. Number #6 is a an array of Sun hardware running CentOS. Number #9 is Cray hardware, again running SUSE. All three are massively parallel setups, all with 10000+ cores.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06



And how does massive clusters prove anything in the way of scalability? scalability is the ability to efficiently scale in a single image over a large number of processors. Although a lot of this is dependent on the quality of the code itself regarding the user space applications running - at the same time being able to detect 512 CPU's and then being able to spread a load efficiently over the whole thing is a different matter entirely.

As for HP-UX, the only people who are keeping it around are basically those who need the legacy support - apart from that there are very few 'new customers' whom one can point to who are purchasing HP-UX brand new for the first time (or upgrading their existing hardware without major consideration over moving the work to a Windows or Linux server).

I've always thought that the best course of action would be for HP and IBM to merge their operating systems with OpenSolaris and come up with a single UNIX specification that can rule them all - with the differentiating factor coming from the administration tools and the hardware sits underneath it all. I doubt it'll happen but I think it is the best way to counter Windows and the growth of Linux in the enterprise by at least coming up with a single common UNIX implementation which spans over x86/x86-64, SPARC, POWER and Itanium.

Reply Parent Score: 3