Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Apr 2009 11:53 UTC, submitted by tsedlmeyer
Oracle and SUN We've been debating the merits of a possible IBM-Sun deal for a while now, and even Sun itself seemed to be in the dark as to if it would be a good idea to be bought by IBM. These debates are now all moot: in a surprise move (at least, I didn't see any speculation about it) Oracle has bought Sun Microsystems, at USD 9.50 a share, which equates to a total of 7.4 billion USD. The news got out through a press release.
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Comment by iliks
by iliks on Mon 20th Apr 2009 16:10 UTC
iliks
Member since:
2008-07-08

Enlighten me a bit, does MySQL already support:
1. ACID transactions
2. 'full' SQL syntax support. all types of joins, subqueries etc etc
3. efficient work with indexes
4. efficient support of big db's (terabytes)

Last time I was interested in MySQL was somewhere in 2004. Then it was in disastrous state, not supporting subqueries (!!!) and transactions.

I wonder, what has changed since then?

If 1-4 are still not thoroughly supported, it cannot compete with Oracle AT ALL.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by iliks
by Accident on Mon 20th Apr 2009 17:02 in reply to "Comment by iliks"
Accident Member since:
2005-07-29

Hope this answer your question and more.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_relational_database_mana...

I prefer Postgres and if I need the big guns its easy to migrate to Oracle.

Hey Oracle!..... If you don't like what you bought. Don't destroy it.... set it FREE!!!! (GPL it)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by iliks
by mabhatter on Tue 21st Apr 2009 00:07 in reply to "Comment by iliks"
mabhatter Member since:
2005-07-17

Enlighten me a bit, does MySQL already support:
1. ACID transactions
2. 'full' SQL syntax support. all types of joins, subqueries etc etc
3. efficient work with indexes
4. efficient support of big db's (terabytes)

Last time I was interested in MySQL was somewhere in 2004. Then it was in disastrous state, not supporting subqueries (!!!) and transactions.

I wonder, what has changed since then?

If 1-4 are still not thoroughly supported, it cannot compete with Oracle AT ALL.



Thing is that a majority of MS SQL or DB2 or Oracle purchase really only use MySQL level database functions. Unless you're a professional DBA (which most people rolling their own apps aren't) most people just don't need much past MySQL... hell, they're using MS Access!!!

I think the world revolves around the small pieces. That's what made Microsoft their big pile of cash. The majority of businesses are small businesses, and they just won't ever use apps past a certain complexity. I think with too many key pieces of the Open Source stack in the hands of big companies they will continue to not be developed to the customers that would actually want them and fall in to obsolescence.

Oracle is about as BIG as big businesses come in the IT space, and I just can't see them managing the small projects very well. Not to mention the power they'll have over IBM via Java. Oracle's leaders in the past have been more than willing to use dirty tactics to get a leg up over other companies and are more than willing to subject their customers to any collateral damage it takes to get there.

Reply Parent Score: 2