Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Mon 27th Apr 2009 21:36 UTC
Internet & Networking Earlier this month, Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, gave the go-ahead on a vast project that will establish a national high-speed network providing 90% of homes and businesses in Australia with fiber-optic 100Mbps Internet, courtesy of the government; the last 10% will be covered with a 12Mbps connection via wireless and satellite. Not only will a vast amount of taxpayers be guaranteed an Internet connection, but this will also provide 37,000 jobs at the apex of construction, a plus in these troubling times. Now CSIRO has jumped on the bandwagon with ideas of how to provide the last 10% (and anyone else who wants a wireless option) with a solid wireless Internet connection with speeds eventually reaching 100Mbps versus the government's proposed 12Mbps. They'll be utilizing the analog TV infrastructure for widespread wireless, which is obviously largely in place already. All in all, both networks most likely won't be available to any of the public for at least five years.
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RE: Comment by garf
by Phase Angle on Mon 27th Apr 2009 23:25 UTC in reply to "Comment by garf"
Phase Angle
Member since:
2006-06-28

"and makes it difficuilt for any other companies to building their own DSLAMS."

Translation => other companies don't want to spend the money that Telstra spends

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by garf
by wakeupneo on Thu 30th Apr 2009 06:02 in reply to "RE: Comment by garf"
wakeupneo Member since:
2005-07-06

Translation => other companies don't want to spend the money that Telstra spends


All of this has less to do with money and more to do with breaking the virtual monopoly Telstra have had on the infrastructure in this country for the last 50 years. According to a recent poll, Telstra is the most hated company in Aus ...daylight second...and for good reason.

iiNet were the first to deploy DSLAM's, despite Telstra doing everything they could to slow them down by not allowing access to the exchanges. But the result of their persistance and investment is that I and most of the people I know have been using ADSL2+ on their network for several years now....long before Telstra started offering it.

Our country cousins however have had to wait for Telstra to get off their lazy asses to provide even basic services. Many are still waiting.

Bring on more competition!

Reply Parent Score: 2