Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 2nd May 2009 10:23 UTC, submitted by Luis
Linux Yes boys and girls, it's Net Applications time. Sure, their figures are flawed, and sure, they're misused all over the non-scientifically educated media, but that doesn't mean they do not indicate trends. One of those trends was a slowly rising popularity of Linux, which hit 0.93% market share in August 2008, only to sink back again during the following months. Well, it's April May 2009 now, and Linux has finally crossed the 1% market share line!
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The way :)
by drstorm on Sat 2nd May 2009 11:17 UTC
drstorm
Member since:
2009-04-24

IMHO, Linux needs to continue improving itself. They should keep an average user away form the console as far as possible. In many ways, they should look up to Microsoft for ideas, as MS has proven to understand the way an average user thinks.

The statistics is not the issue. Once Linux becomes better, the market share will reflect it.

Please don't tell me that Linux is good as it is. It is a good piece of software. No one denies that. However, it's obviously only 1% of the market good. People supporting Linux should really stop blaming Microsoft for everything and take a good look at themselves. (I believe there was an article about that here recently.)

Reply Score: 5

RE: The way :)
by RandomGuy on Sat 2nd May 2009 11:41 in reply to "The way :)"
RandomGuy Member since:
2006-07-30

MS has proven to understand the way an average user thinks.

You mean the average user is so mindblowingly retarded that they need to be asked the same question a billion times to make sure they didn't click anything by accident?

Excuse me for a couple of hours, I think I need to vomit in terror.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: The way :)
by Drumhellar on Sat 2nd May 2009 20:29 in reply to "RE: The way :)"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

You mean the average user is so mindblowingly retarded that they need to be asked the same question a billion times to make sure they didn't click anything by accident?


Unfortunately, yes, the average user is that dumb.
And, then there are the ones that click through all the UAC prompts, then wonder why their system stopped working.

Excuse me for a couple of hours, I think I need to vomit in terror.


Sorry. This stall is occupied.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: The way :)
by shadoweva09 on Sat 2nd May 2009 16:38 in reply to "The way :)"
shadoweva09 Member since:
2008-03-10

They're not going to, they're far too happy living in ignorant bliss.

Restating my stance: I will use whether desktop Linux still uses dependencies instead of self contained single file installs as an indicator for whether it's ready to compete in the market. It really is a no-brainer decision if you look at all the pros and cons of the solutions, but the Linux fanboys would rather restate their scripted responses and not admit usability is a valid issue in OS design. (And yeah, businesses don't matter since they only need to run a small amount of software and are not nearly as demanding as home users.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: The way :)
by ichi on Sat 2nd May 2009 19:29 in reply to "RE: The way :)"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

I will use whether desktop Linux still uses dependencies instead of self contained single file installs as an indicator for whether it's ready to compete in the market. It really is a no-brainer decision if you look at all the pros and cons of the solutions


I don't see anything stopping anyone from distributing their software statically compiled with a binary installer. ID and Epic already did so.

I'd like to see how the pros of self contained installers outweigh those of small programs depending on others, considering that the package manager already deals with that.

Package managers provide a way to distribute software, but if it doesn't fit your needs then just distribute your software in any other way you want, and compile it statically if you don't want to rely on installed libs. You can even provide a tarball where the user only has to extract it and run the software right away from the folder he has extracted it to, as does mozilla.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: The way :)
by gustl on Mon 4th May 2009 20:29 in reply to "RE: The way :)"
gustl Member since:
2006-01-19

Restating my stance: I will use whether desktop Linux still uses dependencies instead of self contained single file installs as an indicator for whether it's ready to compete in the market.


Well, having the whole distribution to consist of independent files for each app really makes no sense.

Just imagine the update nightmare whenever a security update for a library, which is part of several programs, has to be done.

The package management is a good thing for everything the distribution takes care of.
All other software, which will most of the time only be 1 to 3 closed source apps, can either use an installer like in Windows, or be some sort of self-executing binary like Apple's.

The alternative would be to give up the choice between several desktop environments and programs and supply ONE complete-install base system, and go on from there the Apple or Microsoft way of installing things.
But I sincerely doubt you will ever see a distro emerge which operates like that. Package managers are too painless for that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: The way :)
by cyclops on Sat 2nd May 2009 23:13 in reply to "The way :)"
cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

IMHO, Linux needs to continue improving itself. They should keep an average user away form the console as far as possible. In many ways, they should look up to Microsoft for ideas, as MS has proven to understand the way an average user thinks.

The statistics is not the issue. Once Linux becomes better, the market share will reflect it.

Please don't tell me that Linux is good as it is. It is a good piece of software. No one denies that. However, it's obviously only 1% of the market good. People supporting Linux should really stop blaming Microsoft for everything and take a good look at themselves. (I believe there was an article about that here recently.)


I noticed your point about the console. I'm not sure if you use the console...a seriouls powerful OS tool that Microsoft is investing time and money in getting an equivalent. I have had a look at my "history" and there is nothing in it I cannot have done though a GUI.

The reality is the CLI is only used for most users to fix a problem through a forum done in a tenth of the time you see Microsoft problems being fixed with its screenshots and click this and click that.

That said X.org up until a year ago was a major problem that is *STILL* being fixed, but for most users they can pretty much get started with no editing though gedit ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: The way :)
by spinnekopje on Sun 3rd May 2009 06:02 in reply to "The way :)"
spinnekopje Member since:
2008-11-29

In many ways, they should look up to Microsoft for ideas, as MS has proven to understand the way an average user thinks.


I think MS has lost that understanding, but because of their marketing in the past they made users think like MS, and not create their products the way people think. The average user is familiar with MS, so it's difficult. The same problem goes for the applications where most users here use MS Office. Those users won't switch to linux unless they first switched to OpenOffice.org. The human being isn't one of easy changing its habitutes..

I've seen it a couple of times before now: learning to use another OS means you have to forget how the other one worked. This is correct for changing to linux, but also for changing to windows, OS X or whatever OS you prefer.

Personnaly I don't care how many or few people are using a certain system, as long as they like it. For the moment I like using ubuntu with my own custom kernel on my aspire one. I know that I won't change back to windows unless windows changes radicaly because in my opinion you have to look in unlogical places for many settings.

Reply Parent Score: 2