Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 2nd May 2009 10:23 UTC, submitted by Luis
Linux Yes boys and girls, it's Net Applications time. Sure, their figures are flawed, and sure, they're misused all over the non-scientifically educated media, but that doesn't mean they do not indicate trends. One of those trends was a slowly rising popularity of Linux, which hit 0.93% market share in August 2008, only to sink back again during the following months. Well, it's April May 2009 now, and Linux has finally crossed the 1% market share line!
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Not really
by ahmetaa on Sat 2nd May 2009 11:37 UTC
ahmetaa
Member since:
2005-07-06

Linux, will never make into desktop with its current user space. Only things like android will pull it to end user, but then again, user will not even know if linux is being used. And they should not. Apps matter, not the OS.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Not really
by WereCatf on Sat 2nd May 2009 11:42 in reply to "Not really"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Apps matter, not the OS.

Not quite. Without a good foundation it's tough (not impossible, but tough) to write good apps, and also the without a good OS the security of all your stuff is negligible. I'd say they both matter. Without good OS it doesn't matter what you run in it, and without apps even the Holy Grail of OS-development is useless.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Not really
by ahmetaa on Sat 2nd May 2009 12:10 in reply to "RE: Not really"
ahmetaa Member since:
2005-07-06

Apps matter, not the OS.

Not quite. Without a good foundation it's tough (not impossible, but tough) to write good apps, and also the without a good OS the security of all your stuff is negligible. I'd say they both matter. Without good OS it doesn't matter what you run in it, and without apps even the Holy Grail of OS-development is useless.


Well, not quite. just use a secure development platform (use a robust virtual machine). most applications does not need low level capabilities. Hint: Android. Besides, linux is not that secure anyway. But with enoug sand boxing it is ok, just like any other OS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Not really
by silix on Sat 2nd May 2009 13:34 in reply to "RE: Not really"
silix Member since:
2006-03-01

Apps matter, not the OS.

Not quite. Without a good foundation it's tough (not impossible, but tough) to write good apps, and also the without a good OS the security of all your stuff is negligible. I'd say they both matter. Without good OS it doesn't matter what you run in it, and without apps even the Holy Grail of OS-development is useless.

not quite.
on one hand, for the vast majority of people, the OS is just a mean to run applications that allow them to leverage the workflow that suits them best

without good applications no END USER will be interested in the OS, for as good as it may be -
except maybe as a technology showcase or a toy, or for those who don't care about industry - recognized, professional grade applications, and /or take pleasure in contemplating the exquisite technicalities of operating systems, or fiddling with alternative operating systems for the sake of it...

OTOH, application development is a classic example of a chicken and egg problem: a platform can hardly grow without catering to the widest possible audience (ie without a supply of good and diverse applications)
but development of new applications would require a large and vital user base for the target platform, in order to be a worthy investment, and not a risk...
or, ISVs could take the initial risk, if given enough incentive - in the form of good libraries, development tools and so on, or maybe assistance in writing / porting their app, or actual funding, or even backward and forward compatibility in the platform (an often overlooked key factor in preserving one's investment) ...

catering to third party developers in every possible way can often contribute to the overall success of the platform, for as poorly engineered, implemented and performing it may be, more than allegedly superior kernel implementation features - as it removes one part of the above riddle

providing *good tools*, a "good enough" but *consistent* platform and the assurance the platform worked well for microsoft in the DOS and win 3.1x times, maybe FOSS could learn something...

Edited 2009-05-02 13:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Not really
by cyclops on Sat 2nd May 2009 23:16 in reply to "RE: Not really"
cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

Apps matter, not the OS.

Not quite. Without a good foundation it's tough (not impossible, but tough) to write good apps, and also the without a good OS the security of all your stuff is negligible. I'd say they both matter. Without good OS it doesn't matter what you run in it, and without apps even the Holy Grail of OS-development is useless.


You can argue this point, but Microsoft is currently spending billions to run things in the cloud, and moving many of its bloat onto the internet, both for lock-in...and its not the only one.

That said Linux is looking stronger as nobody can argue that the space between the OS and the apps is looking weaker compared to that of the browser and the internet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not really
by vivainio on Sat 2nd May 2009 12:43 in reply to "Not really"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Apps matter, not the OS.


On a brighter note, applications are starting to matter less and less as time passes. Once you have a good browser, you have basically covered what most users care about. Running all the warez perfectly is not really that interesting to grand public.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Not really
by bousozoku on Sat 2nd May 2009 15:17 in reply to "RE: Not really"
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

"Apps matter, not the OS.


On a brighter note, applications are starting to matter less and less as time passes. Once you have a good browser, you have basically covered what most users care about. Running all the warez perfectly is not really that interesting to grand public.
"

I think you're really confirming his point.

Applications do matter, whether they're native to an operating system or running in a browser.

It's not the platform, but the application.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Not really
by Craig on Sat 2nd May 2009 13:43 in reply to "Not really"
Craig Member since:
2009-04-15

Android is as much Linux as MacOSX is BSD. Developers are writing to the Android API.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: Not really
by shadoweva09 on Sat 2nd May 2009 16:56 in reply to "Not really"
shadoweva09 Member since:
2008-03-10

Apps matter, not the OS.


Not so much when it comes to Linux though. The apps are a mess of dependencies, people that self taught themselves C and have no idea how to do Object oriented programming, and inappropriate use of GUI designers to through together interfaces. Don't even think about arguing about "the cloud", the best use of that right now is stuff like google docs; and people like owning the apps they run, not renting them and then suffering downtime and connectivity issues. It's a mess and only Linux users would argue the OS is irrelevant (Don't argue, you'll just proving my point in another thread that you're living in ignorant bliss and providing whatever scripted response you learned to defend it.)

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Not really
by Jokel on Sun 3rd May 2009 12:20 in reply to "Not really"
Jokel Member since:
2006-06-01

My friend - Linux IS already on the desktop! No - not overwhelmingly, but it is here. You cannot wish it away - even if you would like to. Even 1% of the total population using desktop computers is a whole bunch of people. It means 1 of every 100 users is using Linux as a desktop. Think about it... that's a lot of people hm?

Thinking about it.. A few years ago people would say Linux would never make it as a OS in general. It is funny to see that "general" is already reduced to "the desktop".

A few years back Linux would not even be considered because there where so many things missing (as they said). Nowadays almost the only complaint is about very specialist software (yes Paintshop also belongs to that) that about 0.0001% of the total amount of users would use, and some hardware from prehistoric hardware suppliers that refuse to even give the specs to write a good driver.

Anyway - Linux is slowly but steadily growing. It does not "pop up", but slowly flooding the lower regions (low-spec hardware etc.) and climbing slow but unstoppable.

I imagine people using other OS'es see this as a threat, otherwise I cannot explain the harsh and unfriendly comments given on a growth to just 1%. It sounds like these people do not even can bare the idea Linux would grow above 1%. This kind of aggression has a bit fanatic coloring. I mean 1% ? Please - why you even have to respond! And then you have to declare over and over and over again "Linux is not ready"? Feels like it has become a (frantic) mantra or something. Feeling a bit uneasy in some way maybe? ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 3