Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 2nd May 2009 10:23 UTC, submitted by Luis
Linux Yes boys and girls, it's Net Applications time. Sure, their figures are flawed, and sure, they're misused all over the non-scientifically educated media, but that doesn't mean they do not indicate trends. One of those trends was a slowly rising popularity of Linux, which hit 0.93% market share in August 2008, only to sink back again during the following months. Well, it's April May 2009 now, and Linux has finally crossed the 1% market share line!
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RE: Not really
by vivainio on Sat 2nd May 2009 12:43 UTC in reply to "Not really"
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

Apps matter, not the OS.


On a brighter note, applications are starting to matter less and less as time passes. Once you have a good browser, you have basically covered what most users care about. Running all the warez perfectly is not really that interesting to grand public.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Not really
by bousozoku on Sat 2nd May 2009 15:17 in reply to "RE: Not really"
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

"Apps matter, not the OS.


On a brighter note, applications are starting to matter less and less as time passes. Once you have a good browser, you have basically covered what most users care about. Running all the warez perfectly is not really that interesting to grand public.
"

I think you're really confirming his point.

Applications do matter, whether they're native to an operating system or running in a browser.

It's not the platform, but the application.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Not really
by vivainio on Sat 2nd May 2009 15:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Not really"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


Applications do matter, whether they're native to an operating system or running in a browser.


Yeah, but since this was in context of Linux vs. Windows, it's meaningless to talk about browser applications (unless we are thinking of Silverlight, which has not turned out to be an important concern).

Internet played a dirty trick on Microsoft, robbing from them their most prized advantage (support of legacy apps). Shrink wrapped app market is dead. Kind of makes you think why they were extremely interested in pushing the "web services" concept back in the day ;-).

Well, Windows has still got the games, but apart from that the playing field is more level than ever before.

Reply Parent Score: 2