Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th May 2009 22:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Many Linux users have experience with Wine, the application compatibility layer which allows some Windows programs to run on UNIX-like machines. During Ubuntu's Open Week event, Mark Shuttleworth was asked about Wine, and how important he believes it is for the success of Ubuntu.
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Not there yet in many fronts.
by reduz on Tue 5th May 2009 22:52 UTC
reduz
Member since:
2006-02-25

Linux is "not there yet" in some fronts
-Design (gimp has barely improved in 10 years)
-Audio (Ardour is good for audio, but no midi support and nothing near VST quality)
-3D (blender is actually the only of the important multimedia apps actually going somewhere)

Reply Score: 0

SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Your third point is very out of date. Maya, Softimage both run on Linux natively, it's a known fact that film studios use Linux workstations for their CG.

Lord of The Rings trilogy CG being one as a example which used Linux workstations.

Edited 2009-05-05 23:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 10

Jokel Member since:
2006-06-01

An do not forget Maya is not the only one!

You also can use Softimage (just purchased by Autodesk - the same supplier as Maya): http://www.softimage.com/ .

And do not forget Houdini: http://www.sidefx.com/ .

Both programs have a native Linux version. Softimage is a bit critical as what distro you could use (Centos 5.2 works great, but OpenSUSE with some tweaks works also), and Houdini works on all distro's I tried so far. Tip: Houdini has a fully working demo version. The only limitation is a low resolution and small watermark rendering. There is also a $99 version that has no watermarks and higer resolution. Very affordable...

Reply Parent Score: 3

ephracis Member since:
2007-09-23

Yeah, multimedia on Linux sucks big time. I installed Windows just to get Movie Maker. I have tried a number of video editing software on Linux but, at least to me, it's not very user friendly.

Gimp does the work for me as a photographer when I only have to do some color channel changes, or adjust contrast or lightness. But their interface is a pain for me. I want ONE window.

But I hope that the major distros will eventually step in and help out on developing some stuff to make multimedia on Linux as awesome as Windows / Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I was going to mod you up, but I can't for the life of me tell if that's sarcasm of the best kind, or you actually hold up windows movie maker as a great piece of multimedia software.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Yeah, multimedia on Linux sucks big time. I installed Windows just to get Movie Maker. I have tried a number of video editing software on Linux but, at least to me, it's not very user friendly.

Gimp does the work for me as a photographer when I only have to do some color channel changes, or adjust contrast or lightness. But their interface is a pain for me. I want ONE window.

But I hope that the major distros will eventually step in and help out on developing some stuff to make multimedia on Linux as awesome as Windows / Mac.


http://www.kdenlive.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kdenlive
http://www.kdenlive.org/tutorial

http://www.koffice.org/releases/2.0rc1-release.php
http://dot.kde.org/2009/02/09/krita-20-host-new-features
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krita

(Krita 2.0, for KDE4, is still in RC stage).

Reply Parent Score: 4

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Have you looked at Gimpshop. All the functions of GIMP with a Photoshop like interface from what I hear.

For multimedia; that's mostly an issue of codecs. I believe Suse/OpenSuse include full codecs thanks to Novell. Codec packs are available for purchase to cover the patent license fees. LinDVD, from the makers of WinDVD, covers your movie watching needs. Mandriva Powerpack includes all the multimedia love also at a reasonable price.

There are also some multimedia specific distributions which include a ton of related software but I can't comment on how they stack up for media professionals.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Calipso Member since:
2007-03-13

Linux is "not there yet" in some fronts
-Audio (Ardour is good for audio, but no midi support and nothing near VST quality)


Try giving Rosegarden or LMMS a shot. I'm not a composer or anything but I have heard good things about the two. Especially Rosegarden. Might fit your needs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Linux is "not there yet" in some fronts
-Audio (Ardour is good for audio, but no midi support and nothing near VST quality)


Try giving Rosegarden or LMMS a shot. I'm not a composer or anything but I have heard good things about the two. Especially Rosegarden. Might fit your needs.
"

Linux does audio.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_audio_software

http://sound.condorow.net/

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080622143124178/Audio.html

For composition & music notation, apart from Rosegarden one can try Lilypond and Musecore

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080626163212768/LilyPond.html

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20070819052014491/Rosegarden.html

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080626144848130/MuseScore.html


For Midi stuff, check out LMMS, FluidSynth and LinuxSampler:

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080406122656131/LMMS.html

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080628142113958/FluidSynth.html

http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080626155705514/LinuxSampler.ht...

Audio-oriented Linux distributions include dyne:bolic, 64 Studio and Wolvix

http://dynebolic.org/

http://www.64studio.com/

http://wolvix.org/

Edited 2009-05-06 12:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2