Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th May 2009 22:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Many Linux users have experience with Wine, the application compatibility layer which allows some Windows programs to run on UNIX-like machines. During Ubuntu's Open Week event, Mark Shuttleworth was asked about Wine, and how important he believes it is for the success of Ubuntu.
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thelastdodo
Member since:
2008-10-07

No, Mark is right. He shouldnt focus too much on being compatible with MS or he'll get eaten. Wine is a nice project but Mark should really focus on his own plans and not care about Wine at all actually. He should certainly not follow MS's plans. When you follow, you dont compete. You are only competing when you are leading. Softwares should be compatible with Linux and not the other around.

Reply Parent Score: 3

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

No, Mark is right. He shouldnt focus too much on being compatible with MS or he'll get eaten.

Why would he get eaten? Just ask Microsoft about all this and ask them why no one sees any need to move to Vista or even Windows 7.

Microsoft created a whole class of development libraries and applications that only run on Vista or 7 with no backporting to Windows XP. As Vista and 7 have limited market share no developers are too interested in writing those applications and with no applications users are not interested in Vista or 7. Even though they can run their current applications on Vista or 7, they run better on XP thank you very much.

Applying this to Ubuntu, it has always been the case that if you can't run the applications that are of interest to people today or get a platform out there to the current installed base then no one is interested in you. It's all about the applications. Mark and Ubuntu are going nowhere ignoring that fact.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Applying this to Ubuntu, it has always been the case that if you can't run the applications that are of interest to people today or get a platform out there to the current installed base then no one is interested in you.


I'm pretty sure DOS could never run any of the applications that was popular on home computers when it came out. Same goes for Windows.
Also, Mark isn't saying they should ignore current applications, he's saying Linux should be able to stand on it's own with it's own applications. He even acknowledges that being able to run current applications is important. The primary focus however should NOT be to just be another way of running Windows applications.
You're just attributing things to Mark and Ubuntu that they've never said. Perhaps reading the actual article would be a good option for you right about now?

Mark and Ubuntu are going nowhere ignoring that fact.

When the choice is between a person who has started numerous successful business ventures and one who's only contribution is seemingly posting on a web forum I'm pretty sure who's business acumen I have more faith in.

Reply Parent Score: 2