Linked by Rahul on Fri 8th May 2009 22:03 UTC
Fedora Core Red Hat, which started the HAL project many years ago, has deprecated it in favor of a new initiative called DeviceKit. David Zeuthen, primary developer of DeviceKit, has posted on his blog about the work done by the Red Hat Desktop team in Fedora 11 for improving the storage layer in GNOME by taking advantage of DeviceKit. This includes desktop notification if your hard disk is failing, a desktop utility to handle RAID and LVM storage, a replacement for the venerable gfloppy, and many others. Look at his blog for a number of screenshots showing the details. "The GNOME 2.26 release in Fedora 11 will ship with a completely different stack for handling storage devices. The plan is to land all this work in the upstream GNOME 2.28 release and most of that work is done already."
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Rahul
Member since:
2005-07-06

Fedora didn't invent PulseAudio. PulseAudio was developed by Lennart as a student and was already being used by distributions as a independent upstream project before Red Hat hired him to continue development on it.

Individual distributions choose to make PulseAudio the default on their own and if you think your distribution of choice made the wrong decision, talk to them instead. It is very silly to blame Fedora because you don't like it being the default in Ubuntu.

Desktop is hardly the only place where there is ongoing new developments and reimplementations. Just this week, LWN covered a reimplementation of devfs that is going into the Linux kernel soon. In fact, compared to amount of new development in the Linux kernel, desktop is small potatoes. It is usually just more visible. That's all.

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Desktop is hardly the only place where there is ongoing new developments and reimplementations. Just this week, LWN covered a reimplementation of devfs that is going into the Linux kernel soon.

Yes, I read that article with some dismay. Devfs again, just when udev has settled down. And for what? A second or two of boot time. And Arjan, who is something of an expert on that topic, says it is absolutely unnecessary even for that. At any rate, I was left with the impression that it was not a done deal, and may or may not end up in the kernel. And I was rather hoping for *not*.

Edited 2009-05-12 02:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Rahul Member since:
2005-07-06

Arjan may well be right but I doubt it is going to prevent the code from going on. Generally, subsystem maintainers get to decide and it seems they are in favor of it.

My long standing opinion is that "no policy in the kernel" was a stupid reason and it is not good enough to deny devfs. Sure, the original implementation was crappy but somebody did come up with a much better one. Linux kernel developers should have just merged that. udev only helps to override existing kernel default device names. Every other Unix/Unix like system seems to have a devfs. Linux can't be that special.

Reply Parent Score: 1