Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th May 2009 20:43 UTC
Windows SuperFetch is a technology in Windows Vista and onwards that is often misunderstood. I decided to delve into this technology to see what it is all about, and to dispel some of the myths surrounding this feature.
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RE: OSX does this
by stooovie on Tue 12th May 2009 02:34 UTC in reply to "OSX does this"
stooovie
Member since:
2006-01-25

Yet, all apps under OSX load supremely slowly. While I can launch Firefox under 3 secs on any hardware under Vista, under OSX, it never takes under 7-8 secs on any mac, including Mac Pro and my C2D iMac with 3 GB RAM. The same goes for iTunes, Adium, iPhoto (crap!), whatever. I`m not the "50 apps open at all times", so I need them to launch pretty quick. With Leopard, that is impossible.

Edited 2009-05-12 02:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: OSX does this
by DavidSan on Tue 12th May 2009 04:41 in reply to "RE: OSX does this"
DavidSan Member since:
2008-11-18

Yet, all apps under OSX load supremely slowly. While I can launch Firefox under 3 secs on any hardware under Vista, under OSX, it never takes under 7-8 secs on any mac, including Mac Pro and my C2D iMac with 3 GB RAM. The same goes for iTunes, Adium, iPhoto (crap!), whatever. I`m not the "50 apps open at all times", so I need them to launch pretty quick. With Leopard, that is impossible.


Yes, Mac OS X is slow lunching comparing to Windows, but it does not have to do with super fetch kind of technology, because OS X does not have it.

Mac OS X has pre-binding, that is different and cache optimizations to boot up. Cache optimizations is similar to what Windows XP offers.

Pre-binding is "something" that improve load of dynamic applications (Mostly Cooca ones). But it is not as super fetch, prebinding is a process of knowing where the applications parts are, so when you lunch it, the app has a fair idea of where to lunch components. In short, prebinding is the technology Apple uses to avoid a Windows Registry. A Windows-like registry would be faster, but it is easy to corrupt, and difficult to repair, as many PC users can testify.

Mac OS X is also slow to lunch apps for other reasons too... Cocoa dynamic nature, for example, which has a runtime kind of similar to a Java runtime, but without the emulation part. .Net Apps are slower to lunch than traditional Windows apps too. But, it has so many benefits to work using Cocoa, that lunching times are considered a bearable trade off. It happens the same with Java and .Net.

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RE[3]: OSX does this
by jayson.knight on Tue 12th May 2009 04:55 in reply to "RE[2]: OSX does this"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

A Windows-like registry would be faster, but it is easy to corrupt, and difficult to repair, as many PC users can testify.


I see this mentioned often, but rarely see it materialize post Windows 2000. Reverting to a previous version of the registry is as easy as running a system restore, which takes all of 2-3 minutes to do. It's still more brittle than it should be, but has come a long way since the Windows 98 days.

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RE[3]: OSX does this
by stooovie on Tue 12th May 2009 10:36 in reply to "RE[2]: OSX does this"
stooovie Member since:
2006-01-25

So Apple launch slowness is a toll we pay for not having Windows Rot? I think I could accept that. (There is OSX rot too, but not that painful).

Reply Parent Score: 1