Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 13th May 2009 10:23 UTC
Intel As was already revealed by eWeek earlier this week, the EU has imposed a massive fine on Intel for abusing its monopoly position. The fine is larger than the one given to Microsoft: 1.06 billion EUR, or 1.44 billion USD, opposed to the 899 million EUR fine imposed upon Microsoft.
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Of course
by linumax on Wed 13th May 2009 14:11 UTC in reply to "Sounds awfully familiar"
linumax
Member since:
2007-02-07

The one and only reason Linux failed on Netbooks is the Grand Microsoft Conspiracy and facts such as:

- Users booting up netbooks and seeing something unfamiliar
- Users not being able to install all the windows programs that they already paid for
- Messed up Linux installations which failed to support webcams out of the box

played absolutely zero role. Everything was perfect until Microsoft came along.

Edited 2009-05-13 14:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Of course
by Kroc on Wed 13th May 2009 14:56 in reply to "Of course"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

"Users not being able to install all the windows programs that they already paid for"

Users don’t install software on netbooks> The majority don’t because it doesn’t have a CD drive, and they’re not used to the idea of software not coming on CDs. The only software I’ve seen users install is either Skype, or MSN.

The only valid reason I could see an average users wanting XP over Linux for is that the Linux software bundled with the machine isn’t MSN enough, and doesn’t support webcam; as you've said.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Of course
by linumax on Wed 13th May 2009 15:28 in reply to "RE: Of course"
linumax Member since:
2007-02-07

Users don’t install software on netbooks> The majority don’t because it doesn’t have a CD drive, and they’re not used to the idea of software not coming on CDs. The only software I’ve seen users install is either Skype, or MSN.


What?! I just consulted my calendar, and apparently it is May 2009. I think most people are familiar with downloading and installing software. Grandma, who is not, or only has CDs, will be able to locate the family geek to take care of it. That's when she is introduced to the sad reality that her 7 year old accounting software and decade old garden manager won't work any more.

From my experience, MSN is not the big deal here, most people will happily use alternatives, as most of them do a good job. Even Office is not that big of an issue most of the time as OO is good enough.

On the other hand, large group of netbook buyers are students looking for cheaper solutions. They are smart enough to move the contents of the CD that came with their textbook to a USB key, but they won't be able to run it. That is the deal breaker right there.

Edited 2009-05-13 15:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Of course
by kaiwai on Wed 13th May 2009 16:20 in reply to "RE: Of course"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

"Users not being able to install all the windows programs that they already paid for"

Users don’t install software on netbooks> The majority don’t because it doesn’t have a CD drive, and they’re not used to the idea of software not coming on CDs. The only software I’ve seen users install is either Skype, or MSN.

The only valid reason I could see an average users wanting XP over Linux for is that the Linux software bundled with the machine isn’t MSN enough, and doesn’t support webcam; as you've said.


With that being said, the integration is abysmal. Compare the Windows XP configuration and work done then compare it to their Linux version; I can see why some Linux advocates just say, "if you're not going to do it properly - don't even try" - the half baked attempts have basically given Linux a bad rap as the operating system that couldn't step up to the challenge (when in reality it is the OEM's at fault).

I'll put money on it, if there was an OEM who spent a little time fine tuning and making sure it all works out of the box - spending some time making sure that there is good integration; and it might actually involve hiring a dozen programmers to contribute back code to the linux kernel and open source stack - maybe license CODECs so that the out of the box experience is as smooth as possible.

The problem is that OEM vendors expect a solution to drop out of the sky instead of realising that this is their chance to make a unique experience for their customers - something that makes their product stand out from the rest. For those wondering, yes, I will pay extra for something that works well out of the box over something that appears to be thrown together in a hurry.

Reply Parent Score: 2

No reason at all?
by Drumhellar on Wed 13th May 2009 21:20 in reply to "RE: Of course"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

The only valid reason I could see an average users wanting XP over Linux for is that the Linux software bundled with the machine isn’t MSN enough,


Windows being a quality operating system with a huge amount of software available for it isn't a valid reason?

Linux is a quality operating system with a huge amount of software available for it, but it isn't the only one.

Reply Parent Score: 1