Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th May 2009 19:06 UTC
Linux We all know them. We all hate them. They are generally overdone, completely biased, or so vague they border on the edge of pointlessness (or toppled over said edge). Yes, I'm talking about those "Is Linux ready for the desktop" articles. Still, this one is different.
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Does anyone really find Open Office...
by Dr.Mabuse on Tue 19th May 2009 06:48 UTC
Dr.Mabuse
Member since:
2009-05-19

...As bad as the article suggests?

I've heard this comment levelled at Open Office many times (slow start times) and it's something I've never really noticed on Windows (or Linux.) The difference would have to be really small on any semi-modern hardware capable of running Windows XP properly.

On the other hand, Open Office is a much smaller distribution, seems to be a more straight-forward install (and uninstall) with less unwanted (silent) "system integrations" and I've found it to be generally a far better behaving application suite that does everything I need.

Of course, I have supported Microsoft Office in the corporate enviroment for a long time (from it's 2.0 days) I've had more head-aches from this application suite than I care to recall. The list of problems over the years is, quite frankly, endless - as any honest and experienced support specialist will tell you.

How many people can really find significant differences in capabilities between Word and Writer, or Excel and Calc?

Couple that to Microsoft's perpetual upgrade cycle where you are asked to pay top-dollar for software that breaks backwards compatability intentionally, changes are made for changes sake, and existing bugs are ignored, I'm not looking back at MS Office with any sentimental feelings, that's for sure!

I have similiar thoughts about other points made in this "shortcomings" article, so I have to wonder how "constructive" this author is really trying to be?

Reply Score: 2

trenchsol Member since:
2006-12-07

OpenOffice is an interesting example. I use OO for couple of reasons: it does what I need, it comes with Linux distribution, etc.

If I was Windows user I might have thought in different way. Perhaps I might say: "It looks almost like MS Office, but it is not MS Office. It does most of the things MS Office does, but still not all of them. Why should I use it, when I may use the real thing instead ?". MS Office is not that expensive, after all, and it can be pirated I someone really wants that.

Here is an analogy. Some Windows people told that I could have UNIX shell and many UNIX programs on Windows, if I installed SFU or Cygwin or something else. Just like a hypothetic guy above, I told them: "Why should I do that, when I can have a real thing."

Linux (and other OS) apps should use different models and paradigms to solve problems through software. It was Microsoft who successfully hijacked earlier concepts, like spreadsheet application, graphics environment that looks like working desk, etc. It is not likely that someone else can hijack those ideas again and become successful.

MySQL is a good example, perhaps the first DB engine one could use hassle free. MS SQL required Windows server, Oracle had many requirements, it was highly sensitive on OS version, and other OS and hardware issues. Installing Sybase ASE is a high art. MySQL was easy, a DB server for everyone. A new concept at that time. It was not so much optimized, and that made it less dependent on OS and hardware, easier to install and maintain. Other DB vendors started to release "developer versions" of their servers, which one could run on any PC. Linux apps should be like MySQL, a new concept.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Milo_Hoffman Member since:
2005-07-06

I am a hardcore spreadsheet user and frankly I love Open Office more than Excel.


Most people don't realize it but Open Office calc is a SUPERSET of Excel, and actually has more features that Excel does not. OpenOffice Calc is 100% compatible with Excel ++ extra features.

Reply Parent Score: 2

DavidSan Member since:
2008-11-18

I am a hardcore spreadsheet user and frankly I love Open Office more than Excel.


Most people don't realize it but Open Office calc is a SUPERSET of Excel, and actually has more features that Excel does not. OpenOffice Calc is 100% compatible with Excel ++ extra features.


OpenOffice has nothing to do with Linux. Nothing. It is available on almost all platforms, even before than Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1